NE&C Projects

NE&C Projects2018-07-05T14:54:33-06:00

Because you are an actor in conservation.

Nature Economy & Conservation with the decisive purpose of giving humanity a new economic equation, in which the human being, prosperity and nature of the planet are predominant, develops various projects for the conservation and recovery of nature, for balance of humanity, together with foundations, organizations, companies and people.

We invite you to know more about the projects and to be part of them.

NE&C Conservation Projects

Read more

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Monitoring and Research: Save Turtles2018-07-06T12:55:07-06:00

The turtles

In the food chain, sea turtles develop an intermediary role, acting as prey and as predators alike. Their eggs and hatchlings are consumed by a wide variety of species such as crabs, birds and mammals that ingest them in naturally balanced amounts to keep the turtle population stable.

In turn, sea turtles also help to balance the population of other organisms, such as jellyfish and the sponges they feed on, and whose overpopulation would pose a risk to the destruction of the reefs in which they live.

The turtles also feed on seagrasses, preventing their accumulation from obstructing the passage of currents, which would encourage the development of sludge in quantities harmful to their habitat. In this way the oceans preserve their nutritional quality for hundreds of living beings, promoting their proliferation.

It has been observed that a decrease in the number of turtles has also produced a reduction in the population of many other species. In addition, turtles are fundamental to the marine ecosystem also in its relationship with 2 life.

The sand on the beaches would remain infertile if the sea turtles did not make a cyclical contribution of nutrients.

The arrival of these species to the beaches to spawn, promotes a transfer of minerals from the ocean to the surface and vice versa, maintaining a healthy exchange for both ecosystems.

When digging their nests, they produce the movement of tons of sand, refreshing the nutrients of the beach.

Monitoring and Research on all Turtle marine species of Costa Rica and Panama about de effects of climate change in others

Sea turtle populations today have many threats; direct human activities (hunting of adults and consumption of eggs), indirect human activities (urban development, overfishing and contamination by plastic) and other factors such as depredation of nests (wild animals and domestic dogs) and the possible effect of climate change ( high tides, floods, events and extreme temperatures).

In Playa Carate, La Leona and Río Oro, 4 species of turtle nest, the Olive Ridley Sea Turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) which is in vulnerable condition according to the IUCN Red List, the Pacific Green Turtle or Black (Chelonia mydas) which is It is in danger of extinction, the Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) which is in critical danger of extinction and the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriácea) that is in vulnerable condition. Therefore, it is imperative that, together with turtle monitoring, we develop studies that help us formulate proposals for mitigation and adaptation to the different threats, especially to Climate Change.

A monitoring and research project gives us the opportunity to involve different local actors, volunteers and conservation organizations. The air temperature of the earth’s surface has increased twice the temperature of the oceans since 1979 (Trenberth et al., 2007) and the evidence indicates that the warming will continue to increase due to a combination of intrinsic characteristics of the system of land and human actions (IPCC, 2013).

The magnitude of the impact of these changes has not yet been determined exactly, but it is known that they can alter the circulation patterns of marine surface currents, the events of outcrops in the ocean, the location and intensity of extreme weather events and the ocean chemical processes associated with high levels of dissolved carbon dioxide, salinity and pH (IPCC, 2013). Coral reefs are also affected by climate change, as they cause coral bleaching caused by the removal of symbiotic algae (zooxanthelas, Burke and Maidens, 2005), which causes the loss of corals and thus the loss of corals. all the fauna associated with coral reefs, one of the most important habitats for marine turtles.

Plastic debris in the oceans, including lost or non-biodegradable fishing items, poses a great threat to sea turtles, more than 1000 turtles die each year from this cause, young turtles and hatchlings are particularly vulnerable.

The incubation temperature of the clutches can have enormous effects on the development of embryos (as in most reptiles) and the success of neonates, and can be a high cause of mortality.

Considering that marine turtles exhibit gender-dependent determination in temperature, the viability of populations could be compromised due to climate change over time.

The monitoring of the temperature of the clutches, will allow us to determine if they are in the optimum range for the development of embryos. It is also a non-invasive way to estimate the proportions of gender at different temperatures and the implications of global warming.

Phases of Monitoring and Research of global turtle marine species

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Proyectos NE&C2018-07-04T15:10:36-06:00

Juntos podemos hacer grandes cosas.

Nature Economy & Conservation con el propósito determinante de darle a la humanidad una nueva ecuación económica, en la cual el ser humano, la prosperidad y la naturaleza del planeta sean predominantes, desarrolla diversos proyectos para la conservación y recuperación de la naturaleza, para el equilibrio de la humanidad, en unión de Fundaciones, organizaciones, empresas y personas.

Le invitamos a conocer más de los proyectos ya ser parte de ellos.

Proyectos de Conservación NE&C

Ver más

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Photo Gallery2018-06-19T07:54:28-06:00

NE&C Photography by Willy Alfaro

Website
LinkedIn

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Private: Nature Economy R&D LTD2019-05-18T15:41:14-06:00

Nature Economy R&D LTD LogoRecent developments in technology and computer science have made capable hardware and innovative techniques commonplace in the software development arena. Developers have more horse power and tools to maximize results, speed an accuracy.

A second revolution is underway, after the boom of the internet at the end of the 90’s we’ve been experiencing a consolidation of technology in everyday life. This second revolution is bringing new paradigms and technologies to everyone, artificial intelligence, expert systems, automation, real time geographical information systems, the block chain, big data to name a few even quantum computer and algorithms seem to be around the corner.

Nature Economy R&D LTD is a company created with the purpose of fostering and developing these new trends in a way that is not only cost effective but innovative, providing solutions for real use cases and needs. We believe in a mix of software engineers and computer scientists focused on the vision of the company but with enough time, stake and independence to pursue their own creative ends to benefit the company and their clients.

We are aimed to follow the path few companies take nowadays the path of true research and development not politics or the lowest common denominator.

Statistics2018-06-17T10:12:22-06:00

Forests And Biodiversity Worldwide

Forests hold about 80% of the earth’s biodiversity on the planet. Of these, tropical ecosystems cover about 7% of the earth’s surface, but maintain at least half of terrestrial plant and animal species, many of which have not yet been discovered by science.

Forests play an essential role in the water cycle, soil conservation, carbon sequestration and habitat protection.

Of the 8,300 known species of animals, 8 percent are already extinct and another 22 percent are at risk of disappearing.

REFERENCES

Deforestation And Loss Of Biodiversity

Forests are essential for our future. More than 1,600 million people depend on them for food, water, fuel, medicines, traditional cultures and livelihoods. Forests play a vital role in safeguarding the climate through natural carbon sequestration. However, each year an average of 13 million hectares of forest disappears, which, worldwide, represents 17.4% of the equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions.

In tropical and subtropical countries, large-scale commercial agriculture and subsistence agriculture accounted for 73% of deforestation, with significant variations according to the region. For example, commercial agriculture originated almost 70% of deforestation in Latin America, but only one third in Africa, where small-scale agriculture is a more significant factor.

 

REFERENCES

Causes Of The Loss Of Biodiversity

In the last global report of the Convention on Biological Diversity (Secretariat CBD, 2014) it is concluded that one of the main causes of biodiversity loss is given by the pressures linked to agriculture, which encompass 70% of the estimated loss of biodiversity land. The conversion of forests for the production of basic products, such as soybeans, palm oil, meat and paper, infrastructure development, urban expansion, energy, mining, oil exploitation, large dams and logging also threaten deforestation, with large-scale logging being one of the most significant worldwide.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) considers threatened 36% of the 48,000 species evaluated until 2010 and the Living Planet Index (WWF-UNEP), which synthesizes the evolution of 5000 populations of 1,700 vertebrate species in all the world, recorded an average decline of 40% in the last 30 years (2013).

REFERENCES

Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) (PNUD)

The 2030 agenda on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Objectives, is a universal call for action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The 17 Objectives are based on the achievements of the Millennium Development Goals, although they include new areas such as climate change, economic inequality, innovation, sustainable consumption and peace and justice, among other priorities. The Objectives are interrelated, often the key to one’s success will involve the issues most frequently linked to another.

 Eradicating poverty in all its forms continues to be one of the main challenges facing humanity. While the number of people living in extreme poverty decreased by more than half between 1990 and 2015 (from 1,900 million to 836 million), still too many struggle to meet the most basic needs. Worldwide, more than 800 million people still live on less than US $1.25 a day and many lack access to adequate food, water and sanitation. The accelerated economic growth of countries like China and India has lifted millions of people out of poverty, but progress has been uneven. The possibility of women living in poverty is disproportionately high in relation to men, due to unequal access to paid work, education and property.

End all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030 and ensure access for all people. Extreme hunger and malnutrition remain major obstacles to the development of many countries. An estimated 795 million people suffered from chronic malnutrition in 2014, often as a direct result of environmental degradation, drought and loss of biodiversity. More than 90 million children under the age of five are dangerously underweight and one in four people go hungry in Africa.

 

The objective is to achieve universal health coverage and to provide safe and affordable medicines and vaccines for all. An essential part of this process is to support the research and development of vaccines. Despite these remarkable advances, every year more than 6 million children die before the age of five and 16,000 children die every day due to preventable diseases, such as measles and tuberculosis. Every day, hundreds of women die during pregnancy or childbirth and in rural areas only 56 percent of births are attended by trained professionals. AIDS is now the leading cause of death among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, a region that continues to suffer the ravages of this disease.

 

The objective of achieving an inclusive and quality education for all is based on the firm conviction that education is one of the most powerful and proven engines to guarantee sustainable development. To this end, the objective is to ensure that all girls and boys complete their free primary and secondary education by 2030. It also aims to provide equal access to affordable technical training and eliminate gender and income disparities, in addition to achieving universal access to quality higher education. Since 2000 there has been enormous progress in the goal of universal primary education. The total enrollment rate reached 91% in the developing regions in 2015 and the number of children who do not attend school fell by almost half worldwide. There have also been significant increases in literacy rates and more girls than ever before today attending school.

Guaranteeing universal access to reproductive and sexual health and granting women equal rights in access to economic resources, such as land and property, are fundamental goals to achieve this goal. Today more women than ever hold public office, but encouraging more women to become leaders in all regions will help strengthen policies and laws aimed at achieving greater gender equality.

In order to guarantee universal access to safe and affordable drinking water for all by 2030, it is necessary to make adequate investments in infrastructure, provide sanitary facilities and promote hygiene practices at all levels. Water scarcity affects more than 40 percent of the world’s population, an alarming number that is likely to grow with the increase in global temperatures due to climate change. Although 2.1 billion people have gained access to better water and sanitation conditions since 1990, the declining availability of quality drinking water is a major problem that afflicts all continents.

Expanding infrastructure and improving technology for clean energy in all developing countries is a crucial objective that can stimulate growth while helping the environment. Between 1990 and 2010, the number of people with access to electricity increased by 1,700 million. However, along with the growth of the world population, so will the demand for affordable energy. The global economy dependent on fossil fuels and the increase of greenhouse gas emissions are generating drastic changes in our climate system, and these consequences have had an impact on each continent.

The Sustainable Development Goals aim to stimulate sustainable economic growth by increasing levels of productivity and technological innovation. Promoting policies that stimulate entrepreneurship and job creation is crucial for this purpose, as well as effective measures to eradicate forced labor, slavery and human trafficking. With these goals in mind, the goal is to achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all men and women by 2030. Over the past 25 years, the number of workers living in conditions of extreme poverty has drastically decreased, despite the impact of the 2008 economic crisis and global recessions. In developing countries, the middle class today represents more than 34% of total employment, a figure that almost tripled between 1991 and 2015.

Reducing this digital divide is crucial to guarantee equal access to information and knowledge, and promote innovation and entrepreneurship. Investment in infrastructure and innovation are fundamental drivers of growth and economic development. With more than half of the world’s population living in cities, mass transit and renewable energy are increasingly important, as well as the growth of new industries and information and communication technologies. More than 4,000 million people still do not have access to the Internet and 90 percent come from the developing world.

Unequal income is a global problem that requires global solutions. These include improving regulation and control of markets and financial institutions and encouraging development assistance and foreign direct investment for regions that need it most. Another key factor to bridge this gap is to facilitate migration and safe mobility of people. Inequality is increasing and the richest 10 percent of the population stays with up to 40 percent of the total world income. In turn, the poorest 10 percent get only between 2 and 7 percent of total income. In developing countries, inequality has increased by 11 percent, considering the population increase.

Improving the safety and sustainability of cities implies guaranteeing access to safe and affordable housing and the improvement of marginal settlements. It also includes making investments in public transport, creating green public areas and improving urban planning and management so that it is participatory and inclusive. More than half of the world’s population lives today in urban areas. In 2050, that number will have increased to 6,500 million people, two thirds of humanity. It is not possible to achieve sustainable development without radically transforming the way we build and manage urban spaces. The rapid growth of cities in the developing world, together with the increase in migration from the countryside to the city, has led to an explosive increase in mega cities. In 1990, there were 10 cities with more than 10 million inhabitants in the world. In 2014, the figure had increased to 28, where a total of about 453 million people live.

The consumption of a large proportion of the world’s population is still insufficient to satisfy even their basic needs. In this context, it is important to halve the per capita food waste in the world at the retail and consumer level to create more efficient production and supply chains. This can contribute to food security and lead us to an economy that uses resources more efficiently. To achieve economic growth and sustainable development, it is urgent to reduce the ecological footprint by changing the methods of production and consumption of goods and resources. Agriculture is the main consumer of water in the world and irrigation represents today almost 70 percent of all fresh water available for human consumption.

Support the most vulnerable regions – such as landlocked countries and island states – to adapt to climate change, must go hand in hand with efforts to integrate disaster risk reduction measures in national policies and strategies. With political will and a wide range of technological measures, it is still possible to limit the increase in global average temperature to 2 ° C with respect to pre-industrial levels. To achieve this, urgent collective actions are required. The average annual losses caused only by earthquakes, tsunamis, tropical cyclones and floods reach hundreds of billions of dollars and require investments of about US $ 6,000 million annually only in disaster risk management. The objective at the level of climate action is to mobilize US $ 100 billion annually until 2020, in order to address the needs of developing countries and help mitigate climate-related disasters.

The Sustainable Development Goals generate a framework to order and sustainably protect marine and coastal ecosystems from terrestrial pollution, as well as to address the impacts of ocean acidification. Improving the conservation and sustainable use of ocean resources through international law will also help mitigate some of the challenges facing the oceans. The livelihoods of more than 3 billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity. However, 30 percent of the world’s fish stocks are overexploited, reaching a level well below that needed to produce a sustainable yield. The oceans also absorb about 30 percent of the carbon dioxide generated by human activities and there has been a 26 percent increase in the acidification of the seas since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Marine pollution, which comes mostly from land-based sources, has reached alarming levels: for every square kilometer of ocean there is an average of 13,000 pieces of plastic waste.

Protect, restore and promote the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, stop and reverse land degradation and stop the loss of biodiversity “. The current land degradation is unprecedented and the loss of arable land is 30 to 35 times higher than the historical rate. Droughts and desertification also increase every year; their losses amount to 12 million hectares and affect poor communities around the world. Of the 8,300 known species of animals, 8 percent are already extinct and another 22 percent are at risk of disappearing.

The Sustainable Development Goals seek to substantially reduce all forms of violence and work with governments and communities to find durable solutions to conflicts and insecurity. The strengthening of the rule of law and the promotion of human rights is fundamental in this process, as well as reducing the flow of illicit arms and consolidating the participation of developing countries in the institutions of global governance.

The Sustainable Development Goals can only be achieved with a determined commitment to global partnerships and cooperation. Although official assistance for the development of developed economies increased by 66 percent between 2000 and 2014, humanitarian crises caused by conflicts or natural disasters continue to demand more resources and financial aid. Many countries also require this assistance to stimulate growth and commercial exchange. Today the world is more interconnected than ever. Improving access to technology and knowledge is an important way to exchange ideas and foster innovation. To achieve sustainable growth and development, it is vital that policies be coordinated to help developing countries manage their debt and to promote investment for the least developed. The purpose of the objectives is to improve North-South and South-South cooperation, supporting national plans in the fulfillment of all goals. Promoting international trade and helping developing countries to increase their exports is part of the challenge of achieving an equitable and rule-based universal trading system that is fair, open and benefits everyone.

REFERENCES

Costa Rica

Costa Rica is important internationally in terms of its biodiversity because in a relatively small territory it harbors a great wealth of species approximately 3.6% of the biodiversity expected for the planet (between 13 and 14 million species). The country has an approximate record of 95,157 of known species by 2015, that is, approximately 5% of the biodiversity that is known worldwide (about two million species known to the year 2005) (National Biodiversity Strategy 2016 – 2025).

However, there are multiple signals and reports that this biodiversity is being lost and deteriorating; For example, the “Red List” of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) registered a growth of 12.9% in the number of threatened species between 2011 and 2014 (SINAC, 2014 and PEN, 2015).

In more rural landscapes, the most prominent habitat transformation took place in the middle of the last century, especially in the livestock landscape. In recent decades, the country has recovered its forest cover to reach 53% nationally in 2014; a landmark of Costa Rica worldwide; however, in some cases it has become more intensive agricultural practices in terms of the use of agrochemicals and net coverage of some wetlands, particularly mangroves, has been lost due to agricultural transformation.

Territorial management: The way in which land is managed and managed is key to understanding environmental performance. The patterns observed today in the country compromise sustainability: in the last international measurement of the ecological footprint (Global Footprint Network, 2017, with data from 2013) Costa Rica shows a 62.1% gap between the use of its population makes of the resources, and the capacity of the territory to provide them and replace them, that gap is evident in two aspects: Urban growth and agricultural land use.

Water Resources: The Minae Water Authority estimates that the availability of fresh water in the country is 103,120 million cubic meters per year, of which, in 2016, 12,436 million were extracted for all uses, 98.6% were from superficial sources and 1.4% of the subsoil.

REFERENCES

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Contact2018-07-18T12:52:56-06:00

Because you are an actor in conservation.

Conservation is the most important factor in the World Economy.

Blog2018-06-19T09:29:15-06:00

What is biodiversity and why does it matter to us?

June 19th, 2018|0 Comments

It is the variety of life on Earth, in all its forms and all its interactions. If that sounds bewilderingly broad, that’s because it is. Biodiversity is the most complex feature of our planet and it is the most vital. “Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity,” says Prof David Macdonald, at Oxford University.

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Darién Conservation Unit2018-06-15T11:57:07-06:00
Find out more about conservation areas in Panamá

Location And General Description

The Darien region encompasses the Panamanian province of Darién, the indigenous districts of Guna Yala, Madugandí, Wargandí, Emberá-Wounaan, the districts of Chimán and the east of Chepo, all in the Republic of Panama, and the northern departments of Chocó and Antioquia, west of the Gulf of Urabá, in Colombia.

The meaning of Darién originates in the language spoken by the indigenous Cueva, an indigenous tribe that was exterminated by the Conquistadores throughout the sixteenth century. Precisely of the name Tanel or Tanela, river that ends in the left margin of the low Atrato. The river Tanela (the Aluka Tiwal of the natives), Spanishized and degenerated by the pronunciation, remained with the name of Darien. With this name was designated the region where they settled and the different indigenous communities that were there or were established.

Characteristics

Rainfall reaches 1,700 to 2,000 mm annually in the vicinity of the inlet of Garachiné, with a marked period of drought between the months of January to April. However, in the foothills and valleys of the interior of the province, rainfall can exceed 8,000 mm per year and there is virtually no dry season, because it is framed in the region considered the rainiest on the planet. The temperature varies according to the altitude between 17 ° and 35 ° C. The different types of soils and their suitability for use are mainly associated with their topographic variations and geological generating materials.

The region has a dense and rugged nature. The tropical forest in the Darién National Park is so dense that it is the only place in Panama where the Pan-American Highway (which runs from Alaska to Argentina) does not arrive.

Biodiversity

The Darién is the place with the highest number of sport fishing records of any other place in the world, as well as the home of the Harpy Eagle, the largest predatory bird in the world, once in danger of extinction and now rehabilitating itself Thanks to conservationists.

Darién is considered one of the most biologically diverse regions of Central America and there is a great variety of landscapes that range from coastal plains and low coasts to hills and high mountainous areas. This is the region of Panama that is most associated with jungles, mangroves and rivers; impressions that come from the time of the conquest, and still persist in most of the population, partly by the relative inaccessibility of the east of the country.

Although studies indicate the existence of a great biological diversity, which includes widely distributed and endemic species, known only to the province of Darién, it is presumed that the height and precipitation conditions that exist in the mountainous areas of this region (Pirre and Tacarcuna hills), make these areas a place where plant and animal species can exist, not described by science.

Types And Gravity Of Threats

The Darien is the main receptor of settlers from the west of the country, and at the same time a large number of extractive activities of its natural resources. The unplanned exploitation and use of the natural resources of the Darien province occurred from the colonial period with gold exploitation in the northern region of the Darién, in the sixteenth century, and recently with the extraction of cork, tagua and wood for purposes commercial.

However, the traditional use of natural resources and biodiversity in Darien is essential, especially for indigenous ethnic groups, since their ancestral times have depended on life activities such as subsistence hunting, artisanal fishing and the collection of products of the forest (seeds, fruits, roots). Additionally, the use of natural resources and biodiversity is related to mythical-religious beliefs, traditional uses, crafts and botanical medicine.

The plants are one of the most used resources by the communities due to their nutritional, medicinal, ornamental, artisan, spiritual and as building materials for their homes. In addition to its traditional use, plants also have an important economic use for some communities and their inhabitants, through the sale of wood. In the commercial field Darién has distinguished itself as the most important source of wood in the country.

This activity, which has been mainly in the hands of large timber companies, is the one that has had the greatest impact in the province, since the wood is extracted to satisfy not only the national market, but also the world market. Normally the product is marketed through intermediaries of the capital city, so Darién does not receive any benefit from this activity.

Darién is the province with the largest amount of forest cover in Panama, (75% of its territory and 37.5% nationally), it is also the one that loses more forests annually, according to ANAM data (INRENARE, 1995), which indicates , in addition to the existing forest cover, the amount of forest lost in the country between 1987 and 1992.

The amount of forests cut in Darién represents 36.2% of the deforested area in the country, which reveals that in this region more forest cover was eliminated during those six years. Although this figure represents only 8% of the province’s forest area by 1986, the rate of deforestation of 50,000 hectares per year increases as people emphasize subsistence agriculture and extensive livestock.

For the dry season of the 97-98 period, deforestation caused by the uncontrolled wildfires of Darién and the eastern region of Panama, equaled the figures cited above for the period 87-92, according to information published in local newspapers. However, official ANAM figures for the period from December 1997 to June 1998 revealed that 77,586 hectares of forest and stubble were lost due to forest fires throughout Panama.

These figures are much lower than those published in 1997 by the Central American Council of Forests and Protected Areas (CCAB / CCAP) of the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD), for the same period, which are 146,860 hectares and 104,900 hectares of land. pastures, stubble and crops, for a total of 251,760 hectares affected by fires throughout the country.

Actual State

The legal designation of Darién National Park (PND), and other protected areas such as the Biological Corridor of the Serrania de Bagre, Serranía Filo del Tallo Hydrological Reserve, Patiño Point Wetland, Canglón Forest Reserve, Punta Patiño Private Nature Reserve and Emberá-Wounaan Comarca , contributed effectively to stop the uncontrolled migration towards the mountainous and wooded areas of the province.

Subsequently, the designation in 1983 of the PND as a Biosphere Reserve, seeks to consolidate the protection of these ecosystems, through a balanced integration between the population and its natural environment, and thus meet human needs through the promotion of ecologically sustainable development.

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Panamá2018-06-15T11:52:11-06:00

A meeting point of cultures from around the world 

Panama is a country located in the southeast of Central America. Its official name is Republic of Panama and its capital is the city of Panama. It limits to the north with the Caribbean Sea, to the south with the Pacific Ocean, to the east with Colombia and to the west with Costa Rica. It has an area of ​​75 420 km². Located on the Isthmus of Panama, an isthmus that links South America with Central America, its mountainous territory is interrupted only by the Panama Canal. Its population is 4,115,897.2 On January 1, 2014, the province of Panamá Oeste was created, thus being constituted by 10 provinces and by five indigenous districts.

Its condition as a transit country made it an early meeting point for cultures from all over the world. The country is the geographical scenario of the Panama Canal that facilitates communication between the coasts of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and that significantly influences world trade. And now with the recent inauguration of the expanded Canal, it offers a greater transit of cultures. Due to its geographical position, it currently offers the world a wide platform of maritime, commercial, real estate and financial services, including the Colon Free Zone, the largest free zone in the continent and the second in the world.

Conservation Units In Panamá

Read more

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Tortuguero Conservation Unit2018-06-15T11:46:06-06:00
Find out more about conservation areas in Costa Rica

Location and General Description

In the Tortuguero National Park and its buffer zone the humid tropical forest predominates. The average annual rainfall reaches 6,000 mm. The months of greatest precipitation correspond to July and December, the least rainy are March, April and October. The average annual temperature ranges between 25 °C and 30 °C. The heat, the humidity and the rain are companions in the route.

Characteristics

Covering the lowlands of the Caribbean, mainly in the elevation of over 500 m., From southern Nicaragua, including northern Costa Rica and most of the Panamanian Caribbean, wet forests represent the epitome of humid and tropical forest. This forest ecoregion evolved from unique combinations of North American and South American flora and fauna, which met with the union of these continents 3 million years ago (Rich and Rich 1983). The resulting mixture has produced one of the richest and most diverse associations of plants and animals of any area of comparable size (Raven 1985). At present, a large part of this ecoregion has become subsistence and commercial agriculture.

Ecological Importance

  • Protects beaches for the spawning of 4 species of sea turtles: Green (Chelonia mydas), Baula (Dermochelys coriacea), Hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), Cabezona (Caretta caretta).
  • Protects important populations of endangered species.
  • Protects the habitat of the manatee (Trichechus manatus), which is one of the scarce and most threatened mammals in Costa Rica.
  • Protects the habitat of the largest of the felines in America. Tortuguero has one of the largest populations in Costa Rica and a consolidated research program.
  • Protects the ecosystem called Yolillal (Raphia taedigera).

Biodiversity

Flora and fauna (identified to the present):

  • 734 plant species.
  • 442 species of birds.
  • 138 species of mammals (101 genera and 32 families).
  • 118 reptile species (76 genera and 22 families).
  • 58 amphibian species (27 genera and 11 families).
  • 460 species of arthropods.

 

Featured Species:

  • Green turtle (Chelonia mydas): One of the initial reasons for the creation of the NTP is that this species has Tortuguero as one of the main spawning beaches in the world.
  • Green macaw (Ara ambigua): A species of bird in danger of extinction that has been recovering its population with Tortuguero as one of the main nesting and feeding sites.
  • Caiman (Caiman cocodilus): Species present along the Tortuguero canals, it is sometimes possible to observe it while sunbathing.
  • Black turtle (Rhinoclemmys funerea): One of the Tortuguero river species. In the channels you can get to see several in the same trunk.
  • Jacana (Jacana jacana): One of the most colorful species of birds present in the Tortuguero canals.
  • Needle duck (Anhinga anhinga): Bird characteristic of the Tortuguero canals, it can be observed on branches drying its wings after submerging to hunt.

Tortuguero Protective Zone

It has 13,000 ha and consists mostly of yolillales, associations on flooded soils in which the yolillo palm (Raphia taedigera) is dominant and very rainy forests, which are dominated by species such as cedar (Carapa guianensis) and golden fruit (Virola koschmyi). It forms part, together with the other protected areas of the area, of the SI-A-PAZ Costa Rica – Nicaragua Project, which is one of the most important links in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. You can go along the rivers that flow into the Tortuguero canals.

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Chirripó Conservation Unit2018-06-15T11:39:05-06:00
Find out more about conservation areas in Costa Rica

Location And General Description

Chirripó includes very humid, rainy and cloudy forests, as well as regions crowned by peaks and rocky massifs where cold swamps are found.

We find an extraordinary number of habitats, product of the differences in height, soil, climate and terrain, such as paramos, marshes, oak groves, madronales, the helechales (composed mostly of fern two meters high and by moss) and mixed forests. These cover most of their territory and include extensive oak groves whose branches remain loaded with epiphytic plants. Some of the most common species are white oak, aguacatillo, rose wrath, sweet cedar and tirrá.

More than 263 species of amphibians and reptiles have been observed, the most common being the lizard, the salamander and the anurans. Among the mammals we find the tapir, the puma, the jaguar, the white-headed, the ocelot, the cacomistle, the tolomuco and the breñero lion.

There are about 400 species of birds, among which stand out the quetzal, the crested eagle, the black guan, and the carpenter face.

Characteristics

The montane forests of Talamanca form an ecoregion of mountain forest that belongs to the biome of the humid tropical and subtropical broadleaf forests, according to the definition of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). It is located in Costa Rica and Panama, and includes the Guanacaste mountain range, Tilarán mountain range, Cordillera Central, and the Talamanca mountain range. The ecoregion covers an area of ​​16,300 km2 and comprises forests at an altitude of 750/1500 masl to 3000 masl and is composed of a variety of perennial species, such as Ocotea sp, Persea sp, Nectandra sp, and Phoebe sp from the Lauraceae family , as well as two endemic oak species, Quercus costaricensis and Quercus copeyensis. Almost 75% of the original forest cover remains intact, and 40% of the ecoregion is within protected areas. However, areas that do not have a protection regime are affected by increasing deforestation, caused by the development of agriculture, the conversion of forests into pastures for livestock, and the extraction of wood.

Central America: Costa Rica and western Panama: This humid montane forest located in the mountainous regions of Costa Rica and Panama is one of the most intact habitats in Central America. Steep slopes, remoteness and relatively cool temperatures have limited the impact of agriculture and human development in most of this area. This region is a habitat for the diversity of very floral and faunal species, many of which are endemic. More than 30% of the flora of the ecoregion, including more than 10,000 species of vascular plants and 4,000 non-vascular plants, are endemic in this area, as are a number of fauna species. Almost 75% of the original forest cover remains intact, with 40% protected by national and international parks (WWF). However, the clearing of forests for agricultural development and livestock pastures have begun to alter the unprotected habitat, as well as the harvesting of wood. Due to the similar distribution to the archipelago of these montane patches along the central mountain range, the beta diversity is high between mountains and ridges, as well as along a gradient of elevation.

Biodiversity

The forest habitats of this ecoregion include the Atlantic slope of the tropical forest, the seasonally dry Pacific slope, but above all the evergreen forest, and “perpetually dripping cloud forest” on the mountaintops, above about 1500 m (Haber 2000). The high annual rainfall, the wind-blown fog and the frequent presence of clouds, probably the most outstanding characteristic of these montane forests, produce a dense and leafy forest with a broken canopy and a high diversity of species. Abundant epiphytes cover the branches of trees, and tree ferns are common. The dominant groups of the tree include the family of Lauraceae, especially in the northern section of the ecoregion, and endemic oaks (Quercus spp.), Especially in the south. The unique oak forest found in this ecoregion is characterized by majestic tall trees (up to 50 m high), strongly dominated by two species: Quercus costaricensis and Q. copeyensis, while Magnolia, Drymis and Weinmannia are also important elements of the tree. The undergrowth is characterized by the presence of several species of dwarf bamboo (Chusquea). The highest peaks and crests exposed to moisture-laden trade winds support an Elfin, or dwarf forest characterized by thick bryophyte mats that cover short, dense knotty trees (Haber 2000).

The separation of these “islands” from the highland habitat of other mountain ranges and their location on this land bridge between North and South America have fostered both the mixing of northern and southern species and the emergence of endemic species in all of them. the taxones. The surprising variety of vegetation types through gradients of steep elevation and between the diverse mountainous massifs of this ecoregion have produced a very high plant biodiversity (high beta diversity) (have 2000). The Cordillera de Talamanca alone is estimated to contain about 90 percent of the known flora of Costa Rica. The friendship international park, which contains a protected area in both countries, contains some 10,000 vascular and 4,000 non-vascular plant species, including several hundred endemic species of plants (Davis et al., 1997). Forests over 1200 m in the Monteverde reserve complex in Costa Rica in the northern Ecoregion support 1,708 plant species, including more than 440 tree species. This high richness is due in large part to its great diversity of orchids (291 species), ferns (175 species), and other epiphytes (having 2000). More than 30% of the flora of the Ecoregion and more than 50% of the high mountain flora of Costa Rica and western Panama is considered endemic to these areas (Davis et al., 1997).

Similarly, more than half of the avifauna of the highlands of Costa Rica and western Panama is endemic to this region (Stiles 1985). Almost 85% of the species with restricted geographical ranges depend on the forest; most of them are endemic species of the highlands of Costa Rica-Chiriqui (Stiles 1985). Endemicity among amphibians is also high (Young et al 1999), and at least seven small mammals are considered regional endemics (Palminteri et al., 1999, adapted from Reid 1997).

Earthquakes, volcanism and landslides (triggered by torrential rains or earthquakes) are the main natural disturbances that influence the assembled forest structure (Clark et al., 2000). Steep slopes and poor soils have made the ecoregion’s habitats some of the most intact in Central America. The friendship international park, one of the largest reserves in Central America, consists of more than 400,000 hectares of relatively intact montane forest. These larger blocks of intact forest are essential to preserve the remaining populations of harpy eagles (Arpaia harpyja) and protect endangered and endangered bird breeding sites endemic to the highland forests of this ecoregion, such as: resplendent Quetzal (Pharomacrus mocinno), three-wattled Bellbird (Procnias tricarunculata), peeled-necked umbrella (Cephalopterus glabricollis) and black guan (Chamaepetes unicolor). The first three of these birds migrate seasonally to lower elevations, demonstrating the importance of not only keeping the habitats intact in the highlands but also connecting them to neighboring middle and lower elevations intact. In fact, more than 65 (> 10%) of the birds found here migrate altitudinally (Stiles 1985).

The mid-Atlantic elevations also contain some of the rarest butterfly species in Central America and some of the highest species of butterflies in the world (DeVries 1987). The populations of crested eagle and painted parakeet were recently discovered at Cerro Hoya on the Azuero peninsula (thin 1985).

Actual State

The ecoregion of Talamanca still maintains almost 75% of its original forest cover (DGF 1989, ANAM [INRENARE] 1992), which is distributed irregularly over isolated mountain areas of the Tilarán and Talamanca mountain ranges. The largest block occurs in and around the Biosphere Reserve Friendship. Deforestation, even in the oak forests of the Talamanca highlands, has been proceeding since the 1950s at an “alarming” rate (Kappelle 1996). The endemic species of oak are also valued for their excellent properties to make charcoal, while rare species of trees such as Podocarpus are very sensitive to exploitation.

The high biological diversity and endemism of the mountainous Ecoregion of Talamanca (Stiles 1985; Delgado 1985; Davis et al., 1997), as well as its steep topography, have encouraged the Costa Rican and Panamanian governments to establish a series of reserves with different degrees of protection. A total of 40% of the Ecoregion is under strict protection, in national parks such as the friendship, Chirripo, Braulio Carrillo, volcano and corner of the old, and the complex of the Monteverde forest reserve. Like most of the protected areas in Mesoamerica (Boza 1996, Powell pers comm.), The mountain parks of the Talamanca forest are small, lack connection or planning, and do not represent the entire range of ecosystems needed to support migrants. altitudinal (Stiles and Skutch 1989) or respond to the possible effects of climate Change. For example, they do not allow the altitudinal movement of the species. Even friendship mainly protects highland habitats at more than 2,000 m, while the mid and low elevations of the Pacific slope are largely absent.

Types And Gravity Of Threats

Despite the steep slopes and poor soils of these forests, continued illegal logging, squatting and land clearing for livestock grazing are making small roads in the remaining large forest blocks, reducing connectivity between the blocks of habitat within the ecoregion and between it and the neighboring ecoregions. Kappelle (1996) cites the conversion of oak forests to pastures and croplands as the main cause of erosion in the highlands of Talamanca; the compaction by cattle of the soil on steep slopes exacerbates the problem, causing runoff and loss of water resources and soil.

While the montane forest of Talamanca is relatively well protected, the recent but drastic elimination of medium elevation habitats in the surrounding ecoregions has isolated highland reserves and made their populations vulnerable to genetic degradation. In addition, cloud forests are particularly sensitive to climate change (Pounds 1999), and their location on mountain tops leaves little chance of adapting to climate change. Many montane amphibians, such as the Golden Toad of Monteverde (Bufo periglenes), have disappeared from some or all of their ranges for reasons still undetermined by science (2000 pounds). Maintaining and restoring forest cover in more of the higher elevations will benefit populations and ecological processes in both the short and long term, but should be complemented by research on the impacts of regional and global human activities on the forests systems.

Ecological Delineation Justification

The montane forests of Talamanca and the central mountain range of Costa Rica and Panama host a diverse and unique association of flora and fauna, which share components with North and South America and the Caribbean and Pacific slopes. Many endemic species are found here, and this archipelago of montane habitats hosts high levels of beta diversity and endemism. Our line follows the Holdridge life zones of Tosi (1969) and encompasses the premontane rainforest, the lower montane rainforest, the montane rainforests, small patches of subalpine rain páramo and all the other Lize zones enclosed in this larger matrix . In Panama our line work follows the UNDP (1970) to include the low montane rain forest, the montane low rain forest, the humid montane forest, the montane rain forest, the premontane rain forest, and the premontane wet forest life zones.

Climate

The combination of significant changes in the ecoregion, climatic variations and the central location along the land bridge between North America and South America provides an enormous biological richness and endemism. Located in the highlands of Costa Rica and western Panama, the ecoregion of the montane forests of Talamanca is located above 750 m and above 1,500 m in some places of the Pacific slope, up to about 3,000 meters of altitude , where they are classified in páramo pastures. The precipitation and temperature in this zone of Central America is a direct result of the elevation and orientation toward the north or south of the mountain range. The average temperature and precipitation for this part of Costa Rica varies from 25 ° C to 2000 m above sea level, at -8 ° C in the highest altitudes, to more than 6000 m above sea level at the highest points, including Chirripó hill, which is the highest point in South Central America (3,820 masl) The high humidity and average annual rainfall is 2,500 to 6,500 mm. Steep geography, and cool temperatures have limited agricultural and urban development, making these humid montane forests one of the most intact ecosystems in Central America.

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
South Caribbean Conservation Unit2018-06-22T12:57:03-06:00
Find out more about conservation areas in Costa Rica

Characteristics

Covering the lowlands of the Caribbean, mainly in elevations below 500m above sea level, from southern Nicaragua, including northern Costa Rica and most of the Panamanian Caribbean, wet forests represent the epitome of humid and tropical forest. This forest ecoregion evolved from unique combinations of North American and South American flora and fauna, which met with the union of these continents 3 million years ago (Rich and Rich 1983). The resulting mixture has produced one of the richest and most diverse associations of plants and animals of any area of comparable size (Raven 1985). At present, a large part of this ecoregion has become subsistence and commercial agriculture.

Location and General Description

This ecoregion located in Central America has an environment charged with constant humidity and precipitation (DeVries 1987). Rainfall ranges from 2,500 mm in central Panama (Ridgely 1976) to more than 5,000 mm in southern Nicaragua.

Until recent geological times, the isthmus south of central Nicaragua was discontinuous, volcanically active, topographically and environmentally diverse. The basalt bed is the primary material of the residual and often unconsolidated soils that cover the mountainous areas of this ecoregion. The old alluvial terraces form the base of the swamp forests and the flat lands in the lower elevations and near the Caribbean coast (Hartshorn 1983; Vásquez Morera 1983). The northern section is formed by a broad relatively flat alluvial plain, with a gradual elevation change from sea level to 500 m, while to the south in Panama, steep slopes rise from the Atlantic Ocean, significantly reducing the ecoregion only 5-10 km wide.

It is characterized by an exuberant forest of perennial trees, that are large and have with canopies, which reach 40 m in height and an extremely rich epiphytic flora. The palm component includes many sub-canopy and understory species. Abundant species of palm trees such as Welfia georgii, Socratea durissima, Iriatea gigantea and in permanently flooded areas Raphia taedigera (Hartshorn 1983). Seasonal swamp forests occur in the lower and rim areas of Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica, particularly along the coast where they are classified in mangrove forests. In these forests, the Sparrowhawk (Pentaclethra macroloba) dominates the canopy, along with the caobilla (Carapa nicaraguensis). The almond tree (Dipteryx panamensis) and the monkey pot tree (Lecythis ampla) are two outstanding species that are rapidly disappearing and are regionally endemic to the lowlands, below 250 m above sea level.

In this area of abrupt and very humid topography, it rains more than 3,500 mm per year and there is no defined dry season. The temperature remains constant around 25 ° C, with possibilities of rain throughout the year, especially in the afternoons. As a result of the high rainfall, the area is crossed by infinity of very stony rivers that are fast and with waterfalls, where some reach several tens of meters of height.

Biodiversity Characteristics

Although biologically it is very diverse, this ecoregion has low levels of endemism. The high species richness is derived in large part from the mixture of flora and fauna of the North and South America, thanks to this land bridge (Rich and Rich 1983, Raven 1985). The resident fauna, including the taxa of butterflies, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals, are, for the most part, species representative of the humid tropical forest that extends from southern Mexico to northern South America (DeVries 1987; Stiles 1985). Wilson 1990; Guyer 1990). Endemic endemism among fauna is almost non-existent: between 80-100% of the mammal species that breed in northern Costa Rica also occur in Panama, Nicaragua, Honduras and Colombia (Stiles 1985, Wilson 1990). However, a series of birds of restricted distribution are shared with the humid forests of the Central American Atlantic, forming a zone of endemic birds together (Stattersfield et al 1999). The Caribbean side is an important migratory route (Stiles 1983); Neotropical and altitudinal migrants comprise about 30% of the avifauna, particularly in the foothills (adapted from Stiles 1985 and 1989).

Some large expanses of primary rainforest remain intact, present only in large reserves, particularly the Indio – Maíz (approximately 400,000 ha) biological reserve along the Nicaraguan coast (Cardenal Sevilla 1990) and in eastern Panama as length of La Amistad International Park. These blocks conserve almost all vertebrate species, including most large predators, although increasing isolation threatens their long-term viability (Powell pers communications, Stiles 1985). Although small in size, the La Selva Biological Station with 1,700 ha in northeastern Costa Rica hosts permanent populations of large predators (Panthera onca) and herbivores such as (Tapirus bairdii) probably because of its connection with the montane-high forests of Braulio National Park Cheek. In fact, this connection represents the last intact gradient of primary forest from sea level close to 2,900 m in Central America. (Lieberman et al., 1996). The Tortuguero National Park, along the Caribbean coast of northern Costa Rica, acts as an isolated refuge for many species, as does the Colorado Bar wildlife refuge – although the application of protection remains a challenge for both areas.

The forests are evergreen, of several strata, very dense and of great biological complexity. Due to environmental factors such as soil, slopes, drainage and wind exposure, several habitats have been developed that show marked differences in the height of the trees and the composition of the forest. The elevation of the forest mass varies, although, in general, it is quite high. Most trees in the upper stratum have more than 30 meters and emergent trees can reach more than 50 meters.

Some common species are the male cedar, the hawk, the maria, the ceiba, the javillo, the guayabón, the pylon, the naked Indian and the milky. Most of the trees are covered by a layer of mosses and lichens and in the branches proliferate orchids and other types of epiphytic plants. In the undergrowth, arborescent ferns abound and selaginella Selaginella sp.

The fauna is rich and varied, although the majority of the species, due to living in the canopies or because they are nocturnal, are rarely visible.

The Hitoy Cerere Biological Reserve, located 3 kilometers away, houses some 40 species of mammals, including some in danger of extinction. Among them are the ocelot, the ceibite, the tapir, the jaguar and the saino. The most easily observed are the tepezcuintles, the guatuzas, the rabbits, raccoons, coatis, squirrels, the three-toed sloth, the ceibite or the banana seraph, the four-eyed fox, the otter, the balsa fox, the mountain goat , the tolomuco, the tigrillo, and the congo and carablanca monkeys. More than 230 bird species have been observed in the area, including the Montezuma oriole, which congregates to build a large number of hanging nests in a single tree; the vulture, the blue-headed parrot, the booby chizo, the oropopo, the bluethroat hummingbird, the colloquial trogon, the green kingfisher and the black curré. Some such as the eared owl, the black hawk and the basket bird have small populations. Others such as the flycatcher, the orioles and the kingfishers, the sergeant, the toucans and the guans are commonly seen during walks along the trails and in the river. It is also common to see frogs inhabitants of the litter, chirbalas, Galicians, cherepo and snakes, both poisonous and harmless. Some 30 species of amphibians and 30 species of reptiles are known. Inside the invertebrates there are bullet and zompopa ants, colorful butterflies like those of the genus Morpho, huge dragonflies, bees and metallic colored drones. As for the plant species, about 380 are known. The forests are always green and very dense.

Actual State

Although there are still some large blocks of intact habitat, the vast lowland forests of the Caribbean have been severely fragmented in recent years (Sánchez-Azofeifa et al., 1999). Tropical perennial forests are among the least represented in Costa Rica’s protected areas system (Stiles, 1985), although there are large reserves in southern Nicaragua and eastern Panama. Most wetland forests in the lowlands are too small and isolated to sustain viable populations of powerful species; the only one connected with tall forests is La Selva in Costa Rica (just over 1,700 ha), which is too small to protect much of the avifauna (Boza 1996 and pers comm, Stiles and Skutch 1989) and other larger taxa. Only about 130,000 ha in the Atlantic zone of the lowlands are currently protected and difficult economic conditions offer little likelihood that the area under protection will be significantly expanded (Powell et al. 1992).

The lack of protection of the Caribbean lowlands and the strong bias towards deforestation at elevations below 1,000 m above sea level (Powell et al 1992) contribute to the fragmentation and elimination of these forests. With gradual slopes and relatively good access, much of the remaining hillside forest in Costa Rica has been intervened or exists in small fragments.

Types And Gravity Of Threats

Flat areas with alluvial soils are found in banana cultivation, while less fertile basalt soils have been cut more recently and converted into cattle pastures. The last remaining intact forests in this ecoregion are currently under tremendous logging pressure and are being cleared quickly (proambiente 1998). In some cases, unregulated destruction is occurring, despite current legislation to protect forests. The clearings have even been made illegally within many parks-including the Tortuguero National Park-that now provides access to poachers.

The Mesoamerican biological corridor, which aims to improve the connectivity between the habitats of the Atlantic slope, can provide some necessary support for new or expanded protected areas or for payments for environmental services provided by private lands.

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Costa Rica2018-06-22T13:08:30-06:00

Goal 2021:

To be the first carbon neutral country in the world

Costa Rica, officially called the Republic of Costa Rica, is a sovereign nation, organized as a unitary presidential republic, is located in Central America, has a territory with a total area of ​​51 100 km². It borders Nicaragua to the north, the Caribbean Sea to the east, Panama to the southeast and the Pacific Ocean to the west. As for the maritime limits, it borders Panama, Nicaragua, Colombia and Ecuador (through Isla del Coco). It is one of the strongest democracies on the planet. It won worldwide recognition for abolishment of its army on December 1, 1948, an abolition that was perpetuated in the Political Constitution of 1949.

In 2007, the Costa Rican government announced plans to become the first carbon neutral country in the world by 2021, when it will celebrate its bicentennial as an independent nation. It is also considered the happiest, greenest, greenest and most sustainable state on the planet, according to the 2016 Happy Planet Index, published by the British think tank New Economics Foundation, which has cataloged the country for 7 consecutive years.

Conservation Units In Costa Rica

Read More
Read More
Read More

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Conservation Areas2018-06-15T12:40:56-06:00

Small Business Loans

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur

  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt

  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam

  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

  • Aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Credit Rating Advice

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur

  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt

  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam

  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

  • Aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Crowd Funding

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur

  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt

  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam

  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

  • Aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

87%

Successful
Applications

94%

Return On
Investment

100%

Completely
Secure

Ready to talk?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit mod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Let’s Talk
Home2019-04-03T12:45:55-06:00

Certificates for the Conservation of the Environment and Biodiversity

NE&C is currently working in Costa Rica and Panama (Tapón de Darién) to develop a program that certifies community based agriculture projects on various aspects including sustainability, regenerative impact, as well as socio-economic wellness of the community. Using the latest in cryptographic methods we can mathematically guarantee the transparency and quantify the impact of Regenerative eco-projects.

What is Blockchain techonology?

Blockchain is a distributed system that acts as an “open book” to store and manage transactions or information. The records, as defined in International Records Management (ISO 15489-1: 2016) are “information created, received and maintained as evidence and as an asset for an organization or person, in compliance with legal obligations or in the business transaction.” Each record in the database is called a block and contains details such as the time stamp of the transaction and the link to the previous block or record.

These records are immutable, so it is impossible to alter or modify the information retroactively. In addition, because the same transaction is recorded in multiple distributed database systems, the technology is highly secure by design.

The most important peculiarity of the Blockchain technology is its immutability, this means that the information remains in the same state ad perpetuam.

How does the NE&C digital preservation certificate work using blockchain?

Certification Process
Nature Economy & Conservation

COOPERATION AGREEMENT

NE&C, communities and landowners interested in conservation meet to work for the environment.

SIGNATURE AND NOTARIZATION OF CONTRACTS

NE&C following all local laws, notarizes and validates all documentation.

CERTIFICATE
NE&C

NE&C verifies and collects all relevant documentation, details the biological inventories and digitizes them.

PROTECTION IN THE BLOCK CHAIN

The NE&C conservation certificate documents are compiled into a compressed file and stored in the security of the NEM block chain.

APOSTILLED DIGITAL CERTIFICATE

The conservatives or mitigators obtain the NE&C Digital Certificate, which due to the technology used, is open to validation and / or verification of any person or organization.

Conservation Areas

The NE&C protected areas are created spaces that articulate efforts that guarantee animal and plant life in welfare conditions, that is, the conservation of biodiversity, as well as the maintenance of the ecological processes necessary for their preservation and the development of the human kind.

The World in Numbers

Read more
0%
Forests are home of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity
0%
Of the species is already extinct
0%
Of the species are at risk of disappearing
0%
Of biodiversity has been lost due to agriculture

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
About Us2019-05-18T15:31:51-06:00

Nature Economy & Conservation

Nature Economy & Conservation was born in 2017 with the decisive purpose of giving humanity a new economic equation, in which human beings, prosperity and the nature of the planet are predominant.

NE&C is focused at first on the conservation of primary forests in areas of the world where they can certifiably pay more in terms of oxygen, water, biodiversity and projection to nearby populations.

Purpose

To be a global entity that generates a new paradigm; the design and implementation of a global economy standard in terms of conservation and recovery of nature, mainly primary or virgin, as well as mitigation and community development.

Promise

To be a global reference company in economics for the conservation and recovery of nature, for the balance of humanity, supported by blockchain technology to generate transparency in our management and guarantee the fulfillment of objectives.

Values

   Transparency
   Excellence
   Quality
   Solidarity
   Happiness
   Communication
   Perseverance
   Creativity and Innovation

Meet the Team NE&C

Mauricio TrejosHead of Global Strategy
Mauricio joined NE&C in 2017 following a career in Project Strategy, where he lead a rapid growth and transformation in businesses from different sectors…
View profile
Alex MarínOrganizational planning
An Industrial engineer who is passionate about environmental conservation, he joined the NE&C team in 2017; he has over 10 years of experience in the development and implementation of…
View profile

The species of the world wait for you.

Let’s do it together
Private: Nature Economy R&D LTD2019-05-18T15:41:22-06:00

Nature Economy R&D LTD LogoRecent developments in technology and computer science have made capable hardware and innovative techniques commonplace in the software development arena. Developers have more horse power and tools to maximize results, speed an accuracy.

A second revolution is underway, after the boom of the internet at the end of the 90’s we’ve been experiencing a consolidation of technology in everyday life. This second revolution is bringing new paradigms and technologies to everyone, artificial intelligence, expert systems, automation, real time geographical information systems, the block chain, big data to name a few even quantum computer and algorithms seem to be around the corner.

Nature Economy R&D LTD is a company created with the purpose of fostering and developing these new trends in a way that is not only cost effective but innovative, providing solutions for real use cases and needs. We believe in a mix of software engineers and computer scientists focused on the vision of the company but with enough time, stake and independence to pursue their own creative ends to benefit the company and their clients.

We are aimed to follow the path few companies take nowadays the path of true research and development not politics or the lowest common denominator.

Galería Fotográfica2018-06-19T09:24:52-06:00

Fotografías NE&C por Willy Alfaro

Sitio Web
LinkedIn

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Unidad de Conservación Darién2018-06-19T07:42:37-06:00
Ver más Áreas de Conservación en: Panamá

Localización y Descripción General

La región del Darien, abarca la provincia panameña del Darién, las comarcas indígenas de Guna Yala, Madugandí, Wargandí, Emberá-Wounaan, los distritos de Chimán y el este de Chepo, todos en la República de Panamá, y el norte de los departamentos del Chocó y Antioquia, al oeste del golfo de Urabá, en Colombia.

El significado de Darién se origina en la lengua hablada por los indígenas Cueva, ​ una tribu indígena que fue exterminada por los Conquistadores a lo largo del siglo XVI. Precisamente del nombre Tanel o Tanela, río que desemboca en la margen izquierda del bajo Atrato. El río Tanela (el Aluka Tiwal de los nativos), españolizado y degenerado por la pronunciación, quedó con el nombre de Darién. ​ Con este nombre se designó a la región en donde se asentaron y a las diferentes comunidades indígenas que allí estaban o se establecieron.

Características

Las precipitaciones pluviales alcanzan de 1.700 a 2.000 mm anuales en las inmediaciones de la ensenada de Garachiné, con un marcado período de sequía entre los meses de enero a abril. No obstante, en las zonas de piedemonte y valles del interior de la provincia la precipitación puede superar los 8000 mm anuales y prácticamente no hay estación seca, por estar enmarcada en la región considerada más lluviosa del planeta. La temperatura varía según la altitud entre 17° y 35 °C, Los distintos tipos de suelos y su aptitud de uso están principalmente asociados a sus variaciones topográficas y a los materiales geológicos generadores.

La región posee una naturaleza densa y agreste. El bosque tropical en el Parque Nacional de Darién es tan denso que es el único lugar en Panamá donde no llega la carretera Panamericana (que corre desde Alaska hasta Argentina).

Biodiversidad

El Darién es el lugar que posee el mayor número de récords de pesca deportiva que cualquier otro sitio en el mundo, así como también es el hogar del Águila Arpía, el ave predadora más grande del mundo, una vez en peligro de extinción y ahora rehabilitándose gracias a conservacionistas.

Darién es considerada como una de las regiones de Centroamérica de mayor diversidad biológica y en ella existe una gran variedad de paisajes que van desde planicies litorales y costas bajas hasta colinas y zonas montañosas altas. Esta es la región de Panamá que más se asocia con selvas, manglares y ríos caudalosos; impresiones que vienen desde la época de la conquista, y aún persisten en la mayor parte de la población, en parte por la relativa inaccesibilidad del oriente del país.

Si bien, estudios realizados indican la existencia de una gran diversidad biológica, que incluyen especies de amplia distribución y endémicas, conocidas sólo para la provincia de Darién, se presume que las condiciones de altura y precipitación que existen en las áreas montañosas de esta región (cerros Pirre y Tacarcuna), hacen de estas áreas un lugar en el cual pueden existir especies de plantas y animales, no descritos por la ciencia.

Tipos y Gravedad de las Amenazas

El Darién es el principal receptor de colonos provenientes del oeste del país, y a la vez de una gran cantidad de actividades extractivas de sus recursos naturales. La explotación y uso no planificado de los recursos naturales de la provincia de Darién se da desde la época colonial con la explotación aurífera en la región norte del Darién, en el siglo XVI, y recientemente con la extracción de corcho, tagua y madera con fines comerciales.

No obstante, el uso tradicional de los recursos naturales y la biodiversidad en Darién es imprescindible, en especial para las etnias indígenas, ya que desde tiempos ancestrales su vida ha dependido de actividades como la caza de subsistencia, la pesca artesanal y la recolección de productos del bosque (semillas, frutas, raíces). Adicionalmente, la utilización de los recursos naturales y la biodiversidad está relacionada con creencias mítico-religiosas, usos tradicionales, artesanales y la medicina botánica.

Las plantas son uno de los recursos más utilizados por las comunidades debido a su uso alimenticio, medicinal, ornamental, artesanal, espiritual y como materiales de construcción para sus viviendas. Además de su uso tradicional, las plantas también tienen un importante uso económico para algunas comunidades y sus moradores, a través de la venta de madera. En el ámbito comercial Darién se ha distinguido por ser la fuente de madera más importante del país.

Esta actividad, que ha estado principalmente en manos de grandes compañías madereras, es la que mayor impacto ha tenido en la provincia, ya que la madera es extraída para satisfacer no sólo al mercado nacional, sino el mundial. Normalmente el producto es comercializado a través de intermediarios de la ciudad capital, por lo que Darién no percibe ningún beneficio de esta actividad.

Darién es la provincia con la mayor cantidad de cobertura boscosa de Panamá, (75% de su territorio y 37.5% a nivel nacional), también es la que más bosques pierde anualmente, según datos de la ANAM (INRENARE, 1995), que indica, además de la cobertura boscosa existente, la cantidad de bosque perdida en el país entre 1987 y 1992.

La cantidad bosques talados en Darién representa el 36.2% de la superficie deforestada en el país, lo que revela que en esta región se eliminó más cobertura boscosa durante esos seis años. Aunque esa cifra representa apenas un 8% de la superficie boscosa de la provincia para el año 1986, la tasa de deforestación de 50 mil hectáreas por año, aumenta a medida que las personas enfatizan la agricultura de subsistencia y ganadería extensiva.

Para la estación seca del período 97-98, la deforestación causada por los incendios forestales incontrolados de Darién y la región este de Panamá, igualó las cifras citadas anteriormente para el periodo 87-92, según la información aparecida en los diarios locales. Sin embargo, cifras oficiales de ANAM para el periodo de diciembre de 1997 hasta junio de 1998, revelaron que se perdieron 77,586 hectáreas de bosques y rastrojos por incendios forestales en todo Panamá.

Estas cifras son mucho menores que las publicadas en 1997 por el Consejo Centroamericano de Bosques y Áreas Protegidas (CCAB/CCAP) de la Comisión Centroamericana de Ambiente y Desarrollo (CCAD), para el mismo periodo, que son de 146,860 hectáreas y 104,900 hectáreas de potreros, rastrojos y cultivos, para un total de 251,760 hectáreas afectadas por fuegos en todo el país.

Estado Actual

La designación legal del Parque Nacional Darién (PND), y otras áreas protegidas como el Corredor Biológico de la Serranía de Bagre, Reserva Hidrológica Serranía Filo del Tallo, Humedal Punta Patiño, Reserva Forestal Canglón, Reserva Natural Privada Punta Patiño y Comarca Emberá-Wounaan, contribuyó eficazmente para detener la migración sin control hacia las zonas montañosas y boscosas de la provincia.

Posteriormente, la designación en 1983 del PND como Reserva de la Biosfera, intenta consolidar la protección de estos ecosistemas, a través de una integración equilibrada entre la población y su entorno natural, y así satisfacer las necesidades humanas mediante la promoción del desarrollo ecológicamente sostenible.

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Unidad de Conservación Tortuguero2018-06-19T07:41:19-06:00
Ver más Áreas de Conservación en: Costa Rica

Localización y Descripción General

En el Parque Nacional Tortuguero y su zona de amortiguamiento predomina el bosque tropical húmedo.  La precipitación promedio anual alcanza los 6.000 mm. Los meses de mayor precipitación corresponden a julio y diciembre, los menos lluviosos son marzo, abril y octubre. La temperatura promedio anual oscila entre los 25°C y los 30°C.  El calor, la humedad y la lluvia son acompañantes en el recorrido.

Características

Cubriendo las tierras bajas del Caribe, principalmente en la elevación de los  sobre los 500 m.s.n.m., desde el sur de Nicaragua, incluyendo el norte de Costa Rica y la mayor parte de Caribe Panameño, los bosques húmedos representan el epítome del bosque húmedo y tropical. Esta ecorregión forestal evolucionó a partir de combinaciones únicas de flora y fauna Norteamericana y Sudamericana, que se reunieron con la unión de estos continentes hace 3 millones años (Rich and Rich 1983). La mezcla resultante ha producido una de las asociaciones más ricas y diversas de plantas y animales de cualquier área de tamaño comparable (Raven 1985). En la actualidad, gran parte de esta ecorregión se ha convertido en agricultura de subsistencia y comercial.

Importancia Ecológica

  • Protege playas para el desove de 4 especies de tortugas marinas: Verde (Chelonia mydas), Baula (Dermochelys coriacea), Carey (Eretmochelys imbricata), Cabezona (Caretta caretta).
  • Protege importantes poblaciones de especies en peligro de extinción.
  • Protege el hábitat del manatí (Trichechus manatus), que es uno de los mamíferos más escasos y amenazados de Costa Rica.
  • Protege el hábitat del más grande de los felinos de América. Tortuguero posee una de las poblaciones más grandes de Costa Rica y un consolidado programa de investigación.
  • Protege el ecosistema denominado Yolillal (Raphia taedigera).

Biodiversidad

Flora y fauna (identificadas a la actualidad):

  • 734 especies de plantas.
  • 442 especies de aves.
  • 138 especies de mamíferos (101 géneros y 32 familias).
  • 118 especies de reptiles (76 géneros y 22 familias).
  • 58 especies de anfibios (27 géneros y 11 familias).
  • 460 especies de artrópodos.

Especies destacadas:

  • Tortuga verde (Chelonia mydas): Una de las razones iniciales para la creación del PNT es que esta especie tiene a Tortuguero como una de las principales playas de desove en el mundo.
  • Lapa verde (Ara ambigua): Especie de ave en peligro de extinción que viene recuperando su población con Tortuguero como uno de los principales sitios de anidación y alimentación.
  • Caiman (Caiman cocodilus): Especie presente a lo largo de los canales de Tortuguero, en ocasiones es posible observarlo tomando sol.
  • Tortuga negra (Rhinoclemmys funerea): Una de las especies de río de Tortuguero. En los canales se pueden llegar a observar varias en un mismo tronco.
  • Jacana (Jacana jacana): Una de las especies más coloridas de aves presentes en los canales de Tortuguero.
  • Pato aguja (Anhinga anhinga): Ave característica de los canales de Tortuguero, se le puede observar en ramas secando sus alas después de sumergirse a cazar.

Zona Protectora Tortuguero

Posee 13.000 ha y está formada en su mayor parte por yolillales, asociaciones sobre suelos inundados en las cuales la palma yolillo (Raphia taedigera) es dominante y por bosques muy lluviosos, en los que predominan especies como el cedro (Carapa guianensis) y  fruta dorada (Virola koschmyi). Forma parte, junto con las otras áreas protegidas de la zona, del Proyecto SI-A-PAZ Costa Rica – Nicaragua, que es uno de los eslabones más importantes del Corredor Biológico Mesoamericano. Se puede recorrer siguiendo los ríos que desembocan en los canales de Tortuguero.

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Unidad de Conservación Chirripó2018-06-19T07:40:53-06:00
Ver más Áreas de Conservación en: Costa Rica

Localización y Descripción General

Chirripó incluye bosques muy húmedos, lluviosos y nubosos, así como regiones coronadas por picos y macizos rocosos donde se encuentran pantanos fríos.

Encontramos un número extraordinario de hábitats, producto de las diferencias en altura, suelo, clima y terreno, tales como paramos, ciénagas, robledales, madronales, los helechales (compuestos en su mayoría por el helecho de dos metros de altura y por el musgo) y los bosques mixtos. Estos cubren la mayor parte de su territorio e incluyen extensos robledales cuyas ramas permanecen cargadas de plantas epífitas. Algunas de las especies más comunes son el roble blanco, el aguacatillo, el ira rosa, el cedro dulce y el tirrá.

Se han observado más de 263 especies de anfibios y reptiles, siendo los más comunes la lagartija, la salamandra y los anuros. Entre los mamíferos encontramos la danta, el puma, el jaguar, el cariblanco, manigordo, el cacomistle, el tolomuco y el león breñero.

Hay unas 400 especies de aves, dentro de las cuales sobresalen el quetzal, el águila crestada, la pava negra, y el carpintero careto.

Características

Los bosques montanos de Talamanca forman una ecorregión de bosque de montaña que pertenece al bioma de los bosques húmedos latifoliados tropicales y subtropicales, según la definición del Fondo Mundial para la Naturaleza (WWF). ​ Se encuentra en Costa Rica y Panamá, e incluye la cordillera de Guanacaste, cordillera de Tilarán, Cordillera Central, y la Cordillera de Talamanca. La ecorregión cubre un área de 16.300 km2 y comprende bosques a una altitud de 750/1500 msnm hasta 3000 msnm y se compone de una variedad de especies perennes, tales como Ocotea sp, Persea sp, Nectandra sp, y Phoebe sp de la familia Lauraceae, así como dos especies de encino endémicas, Quercus costaricensis y Quercus copeyensis. Casi 75% de la cobertura forestal original permanece está intacta, y el 40% de la ecorregión se encuentra dentro de áreas protegidas. ​ Sin embargo, las áreas que no cuentan con un régimen de protección están afectados por una creciente deforestación, causada por el desarrollo de la agricultura, la conversión de bosques en pastizales para la ganadería, y la extracción de madera.

Centroamérica: Costa Rica y el oeste de Panamá: Este bosque húmedo montano ubicado en las regiones montañosas de Costa Rica y Panamá es uno de los hábitats más intactos de Centroamérica. Las empinadas laderas, la lejanía y las temperaturas relativamente frescas han limitado el impacto de la agricultura y el desarrollo humano en la mayor parte de esta área. Esta región es un hábitat para la diversidad de especies muy florales y faunísticas, muchas de las cuales son endémicas. Más del 30% de la flora de la ecorregión, incluyendo más de 10.000 especies de plantas vasculares y 4.000 no vasculares, son endémicas en esta área, al igual que una serie de especies de fauna. Casi el 75% de la cobertura forestal original permanece intacta, con un 40 % protegido por parques nacionales e internacionales (WWF). Sin embargo, la tala de bosques para el desarrollo agrícola y las pasturas ganaderas han empezado a alterar el hábitat desprotegido, al igual que la recolección de madera. Debido a la distribución similar al archipiélago de estos parches montanos a lo largo de la cordillera central, la diversidad beta es alta entre montañas y cordilleras, así como a lo largo de un gradiente de elevación.

Biodiversidad

Los hábitats forestales de esta ecorregión incluyen la ladera Atlántica del bosque tropical, la vertiente pacífica estacionalmente seco, pero sobre todo el bosque de hoja perenne, y “perpetuamente goteando bosque nuboso” en las cimas de las montañas, por encima de aproximadamente 1500 m (Haber 2000). Las altas precipitaciones anuales, la niebla soplada por el viento y la frecuente presencia de nubes, probablemente la característica más destacada de estos bosques montanos, producen un bosque frondoso y denso con un dosel quebrado y una alta diversidad de especies. Abundantes epífitas cubren las ramas de los árboles, y los helechos arborescentes son comunes. Los grupos dominantes del árbol incluyen la familia de Lauraceae, especialmente en la sección norteña de la ecorregión, y robles endémicos (Quercus spp.), especialmente en el sur. El bosque de robles único que se encuentra en esta ecorregión se caracteriza por majestuosos árboles altos (hasta 50 m de altura), fuertemente dominados por dos especies: Quercus costaricensis y Q. copeyensis, mientras que Magnolia, Drymis y Weinmannia son también elementos importantes del árbol. El sotobosque se caracteriza por la presencia de varias especies de bambú enano (Chusquea). Los picos y crestas más altos expuestos a los vientos alisios cargados de humedad apoyan un Elfin, o bosque enano caracterizado por esteras gruesas de briófitos que cubren árboles nudoso cortos y densos (haber 2000).

La separación de estas “islas” del hábitat de las tierras altas de otras cordilleras y su ubicación en este puente terrestre entre América del norte y del sur han fomentado tanto la mezcla de especies del norte como del sur y el surgimiento de especies endémicas en todos los taxones. La sorprendente variedad de tipos de vegetación a través de gradientes de elevación empinada y entre los diversos macizos montañosos de esta ecorregión han producido una biodiversidad vegetal muy alta (alta diversidad beta) (haber 2000). La Cordillera de Talamanca solo se estima que contiene alrededor de 90 por ciento de la flora conocida de Costa Rica. El parque internacional la amistad, que contiene área protegida en ambos países, contiene unas 10.000 vasculares y 4.000 especies de plantas no vasculares, incluyendo varios centenares de especies endémicas de plantas (Davis et al. 1997). Los bosques de más de 1200 m en el complejo de reserva de Monteverde en Costa Rica en el norte de la Ecoregión apoyan 1.708 especies de plantas, incluyendo más de 440 especies de árboles. Esta alta riqueza se debe en gran parte a su gran diversidad de orquídeas (291 especies), helechos (175 especies), y otras epífitas (haber 2000). Más del 30% de la flora de la Ecoregión y más del 50% de la flora de alta montaña de Costa Rica y el oeste de Panamá se considera endémica de esas zonas (Davis et al. 1997).

Del mismo modo, más de la mitad de la avifauna de las tierras altas de Costa Rica y el oeste de Panamá es endémica de esta región (Stiles 1985). Casi el 85% de las especies con rangos geográficos restringidos dependen del bosque; la mayoría de ellos son especies endémicas de las tierras altas de Costa Rica-Chiriquí (Stiles 1985). El endemismo entre los anfibios también es alto (Young et al 1999), y al menos siete pequeños mamíferos son considerados endémicos regionales (Palminteri et al. 1999, adaptados de Reid 1997),

Los terremotos, vulcanismo y deslizamientos (desencadenados por lluvias torrenciales o terremotos) son los principales disturbios naturales que influyen en la estructura forestal montada (Clark et al. 2000). Las pendientes empinadas y los suelos pobres han hecho que los hábitats de esta ecoregión sean algunos de los más intactos en Centroamérica. El parque internacional la amistad, una de las mayores reservas en Centroamérica, consta de más de 400.000 ha de bosque montano relativamente intacto. Estos bloques más grandes de bosque intacto son esenciales para preservar las poblaciones remanentes de las águilas arpías (Arpaia harpyja) y protegen los criaderos de aves amenazadas y en peligro de extinción endémicas de los bosques de las tierras altas de esta ecoregión, tales como: resplandeciente Quetzal (Pharomacrus mocinno), Bellbird de tres vatios (Procnias tricarunculata), paraguas de cuello pelado (Cephalopterus glabricollis) y pava negra (Chamaepetes unicolor). Las tres primeras de estas aves migran estacionalmente a cotas más bajas, demostrando la importancia de no sólo mantener los hábitats intactos de las tierras altas sino también conectarlos a las elevaciones medias y bajas vecinas intactas. De hecho, más de 65 (> 10%) de las aves encontradas aquí migran altitudinally (Stiles 1985).

Las elevaciones medias atlánticas también contienen algunas de las especies de mariposas más raras de Centroamérica y algunas de las especies de mariposas más altas del mundo (DeVries 1987). Las poblaciones de águila crestada y perico pintado fueron recientemente descubiertas en Cerro Hoya en la península de Azuero (delgado 1985).

Estado Actual

La ecorregión de Talamanca todavía mantiene casi el 75% de su cubierta forestal original (DGF 1989; ANAM [INRENARE] 1992), que se distribuye de forma irregular sobre las zonas montañosas aisladas de las cordilleras de Tilarán y Talamanca. El bloque más grande ocurre en y alrededor de la reserva de la Biosfera la amistad. La deforestación, incluso en los bosques de encinas del altiplano de Talamanca, ha procedido desde los años 50 a una tasa “alarmante” (Kappelle 1996). Las especies endémicas de encino también son valoradas por sus excelentes propiedades para hacer carbón vegetal, mientras que especies raras de árboles como Podocarpus son muy sensibles a la explotación.

La alta diversidad biológica y endemismo de la Ecoregión montañosa de Talamanca (Stiles 1985; Delgado 1985; Davis et al. 1997), así como su topografía empinada han alentado a los gobiernos costarricenses y panameños a establecer una serie de reservas con diferentes grados de protección. Un total de 40% de la Ecoregión está bajo estricta protección, en parques nacionales como la amistad, Chirripó, Braulio Carrillo, volcán y rincón de la vieja, y el complejo de la reserva forestal de Monteverde. Como la mayoría de las áreas protegidas en Mesoamérica (Boza 1996; Powell pers. comm.), los parques montanos del bosque de Talamanca son pequeños, carecen de conexión o planificación, y no representan toda la gama de ecosistemas necesarios para apoyar a los migrantes altitudinal (Stiles y Skutch 1989) o responder a los posibles efectos del clima Cambiar. Por ejemplo, no permiten el movimiento altitudinal de las especies. Incluso la amistad protege principalmente los hábitats de las tierras altas a más de 2.000 m mientras que en gran medida faltan las elevaciones medias y bajas de la vertiente pacífica.

Tipos y Gravedad de las Amenazas

A pesar de las empinadas laderas y los pobres suelos de estos bosques, la continua tala ilegal, la postura en cuclillas y la tala de tierras para el pastoreo de ganado están haciendo pequeños caminos en los grandes bloques forestales restantes, reduciendo la conectividad entre los bloques de hábitat dentro de la ecoregión y entre ella y las ecorregiones vecinas. Kappelle (1996) cita la conversión de los bosques de encino a pasturas y tierras de cultivo como la principal causa de erosión en las tierras altas de Talamanca; la compactación por el ganado del suelo en pendientes empinadas exacerba el problema, causando escurrimiento y pérdida de los recursos hídricos y del suelo.

Mientras que el bosque montano de Talamanca está relativamente bien protegido, la reciente pero drástica eliminación de los hábitats de elevación media en las ecorregiones circundantes ha aislado las reservas de las tierras altas y ha hecho que sus poblaciones sean vulnerables a la degradación genética. Además, los bosques nublados son particularmente sensibles al cambio climático (libras 1999), y su ubicación en las cimas de las montañas les deja pocas posibilidades de adaptarse a los cambios climáticos. Muchos anfibios montanos, como el Sapo de oro de Monteverde (Bufo periglenes), han desaparecido de algunas o de todas sus gamas por razones aún indeterminadas por la ciencia (libras 2000). Mantener y restaurar la cobertura forestal en más de las elevaciones más altas beneficiará a las poblaciones y los procesos ecológicos tanto en el corto como en el largo plazo, pero debe complementarse con la investigación sobre los impactos de las actividades humanas regionales y mundiales en los montes Sistemas.

Justificación de la Delineación Ecológica

Los bosques montanos de Talamanca y la cordillera central de Costa Rica y Panamá acogen una asociación diversa y única de flora y fauna, que comparten componentes con América del norte y del sur y de las laderas del Caribe y del Pacífico. Aquí se encuentran muchas especies endémicas, y este archipiélago de hábitats montanos acoge altos niveles de diversidad beta y endemismo. Nuestra línea sigue las zonas de vida Holdridge de Tosi (1969) y abarca la selva tropical premontana, el bosque lluvioso montano bajo, los bosques lluviosos montanos, pequeños parches de páramo de lluvia subalpina y todas las demás zonas Lize encerradas en esta matriz más amplia. En Panamá nuestra labor de línea sigue al PNUD (1970) para incluir el bosque húmedo montano bajo, el bosque lluvioso montano bajo, el bosque húmedo montano, el bosque lluvioso montano, el bosque lluvioso premontano, y las zonas de vida del bosque húmedo premontano.

Clima

La combinación de cambios significativos en la ecorregión, las variaciones climáticas y la ubicación central a lo largo del puente de tierra entre América del Norte y Sudamérica le proporciona una enorme riqueza biológica y endemismo. Ubicada en las tierras altas de Costa Rica y el oeste de Panamá, la ecorregión de los bosques montanos de Talamanca se sitúa por encima de los 750 m y por encima de los 1.500 m en algunos lugares de la vertiente pacífica, hasta unos 3.000 metros de altitud, donde se clasifican en pastizales de páramo. La precipitación y la temperatura en esta zona de Centroamérica es un resultado directo de la elevación y orientación hacia el norte o sur de la cordillera. La temperatura media y la precipitación para esta parte de Costa Rica varía de 25 °C a 2000 msnm, a -8 °C en las alturas más altas, a más de 6000 msnm en los puntos más altos, incluyendo cerro Chirripó, el cuál es el punto más alto del Sur de Centroamérica (3.820 msnm) La alta humedad y la precipitación anual promedio es de 2,500 a 6,500 mm.  La geografía empinada, y las temperaturas frescas tienen limitado desarrollo agrícola y urbano, haciendo que estos bosques húmedos montañosos sean uno de los ecosistemas más intactos de América Central.

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Unidad de Conservación Caribe Sur2018-06-22T13:17:35-06:00
Ver más Áreas de Conservación en: Costa Rica

Características

Cubriendo las tierras bajas del Caribe, principalmente en la elevación por debajo de los 500 m sobre el nivel del mar, desde el sur de Nicaragua, incluyendo el norte de Costa Rica y la mayor parte de Caribe Panameño, los bosques húmedos representan el epítome del bosque húmedo y tropical. Esta ecorregión forestal evolucionó a partir de combinaciones únicas de flora y fauna norteamericana y Sudamericana, que se reunieron con la unión de estos continentes hace 3 millones años (Rich and Rich 1983). La mezcla resultante ha producido una de las asociaciones más ricas y diversas de plantas y animales de cualquier área de tamaño comparable (Raven 1985). En la actualidad, gran parte de esta ecorregión se ha convertido en agricultura de subsistencia y comercial.

Localización y Descripción General

Esta ecorregión ubicada en América Central posee un ambiente cargado de humedad y precipitación constantes (DeVries 1987). Las precipitaciones oscilan entre 2.500 mm en el centro de Panamá (Ridgely 1976) a más de 5.000 mm en el sur de Nicaragua.

Hasta tiempos geológicos recientes, el istmo al sur del centro de Nicaragua era discontinuo, volcánicamente activo, topográfico y medioambientalmente diverso. El lecho de basalto es el material primario de los suelos residuales y a menudo no consolidados que cubren las zonas montañosas de esta ecorregión. Las antiguas terrazas aluviales forman la base de los bosques pantanosos y las tierras planas en las elevaciones más bajas y cerca de la costa caribeña (Hartshorn 1983; Vásquez Morera 1983).  La sección norte está formada por una amplia llanura aluvial relativamente plana, con un cambio gradual de elevación desde el nivel del mar hasta los 500 m, mientras que al sur en Panamá, las pendientes empinadas se elevan desde el océano Atlántico, lo que reduce significativamente la ecorregión a sólo 5-10 km de ancho.

Se caracteriza por un exuberante bosque de árboles perennes, de gran tamaño, con dosel, que alcanzan los 40 m de altura y una flora epifita extremadamente rica. El componente de la palma incluye muchas especies de subdosel y sotobosque. Abundantes especies de palmeras como Welfia georgii, Socratea durissima, Iriatea gigantea y en áreas permanentemente inundadas Raphia taedigera (Hartshorn 1983). Los bosques estacionales del pantano ocurren en las áreas más bajas y reborde en Nicaragua y el norte de Costa Rica, particularmente a lo largo de la costa donde se clasifican en los bosques de manglares. En estos bosques, el Gavilán (Pentaclethra macroloba) domina el dosel, junto con el caobilla (Carapa nicaraguensis). El almendro (Dipteryx panamensis) y el árbol del pote del mono (Lecythis ampla) son dos especies sobresalientes que rápidamente están desapareciendo y que son endémicos regionales de las tierras bajas, debajo de 250 m sobre el nivel del mar.

En esta zona de topografía abrupta y muy húmeda, llueve más de 3.500 mm por año y no existe una estación seca definida. La temperatura se mantiene constante alrededor de los 25° centígrados, con posibilidades de lluvia durante todo el año, sobre todo en las tardes. Como resultado de la alta pluviosidad, la zona está surcada por infinidad de ríos muy pedregosos que son rápidos y con cascadas, donde algunas alcanzan varias decenas de metros de altura.

Características de la Biodiversidad

Aunque biológicamente es muy diversa, esta ecorregión posee niveles bajos de endemismo. La alta riqueza de especies se deriva en gran parte a la mezcla de flora y fauna del norte y del sur de América, gracias a este puente terrestre (Rich and Rich 1983; Raven 1985).  La fauna residente, incluyendo los taxones de mariposas, reptiles, anfibios, aves y mamíferos, son, en su mayor parte, especies representativas del bosque tropical húmedo que se extiende desde el sur de México hasta el norte de Sudamérica (DeVries 1987; Stiles 1985; Wilson 1990; Guyer 1990). El endemismo estricto entre la fauna es casi inexistente: entre el 80-100% de las especies de mamíferos que se reproducen en el norte de Costa Rica también lo hacen en Panamá, Nicaragua, Honduras y Colombia (Stiles 1985; Wilson 1990). Sin embargo, una serie de aves de distribución restringido se comparten con los bosques húmedos del Atlántico Centroamericano, formando juntos una zona de aves endémicas (Stattersfield et al 1999). La vertiente caribeña es una ruta migratoria importante (Stiles 1983); los migrantes neotropicales y altitudinal comprenden alrededor del 30% de la avifauna, particularmente en los pies de montaña (adaptado de Stiles 1985 y 1989).

Algunas extensiones grandes de bosque lluvioso primario permanecen intactas, presentes sólo en grandes reservas, particularmente la reserva biológica Indio – Maíz (aprox. 400.000 ha) a lo largo de la costa de Nicaragua (Cardenal Sevilla 1990) y en el este de Panamá a lo largo del Parque Internacional La Amistad. Estos bloques conservan casi todas las especies de vertebrados, incluyendo la mayoría de los depredadores grandes, aunque el aislamiento creciente amenaza su viabilidad a largo plazo (comunicaciones Powell pers.; Stiles 1985). Aunque de tamaño pequeño, la Estación Biológica La Selva con 1.700 ha en el noreste de Costa Rica acoge poblaciones permanentes de grandes depredadores (Panthera onca) y herbívoros como (Tapirus bairdii) probablemente por su conexión con los bosques montano-altos del Parque Nacional Braulio Carrillo. De hecho, esta conexión representa el último gradiente intacto de bosque primario desde el nivel del mar cercano a los 2.900 m en Centroamérica. (Lieberman et al. 1996). El Parque Nacional Tortuguero, a lo largo de la costa caribeña del norte de Costa Rica, actúa como un refugio aislado para muchas especies, al igual que el refugio de Vida silvestre barra de Colorado – aunque la aplicación de la protección sigue siendo un desafío para ambas áreas.

Los bosques son siempreverdes, de varios estratos, muy densos y de gran complejidad biológica. Debido a factores ambientales tales como suelo, pendientes, drenaje y exposición al viento, se han desarrollado diversos hábitats que muestran marcadas diferencias en cuanto a la altura de los árboles y a la composición del bosque. La elevación de la masa forestal varía, aunque, en general, es bastante alta. La mayoría de los árboles de estrato superior tienen más de 30 metros y los emergentes pueden alcanzar más de 50 metros.

Algunas especies comunes son el cedro macho, el gavilán, el maría, el ceiba , el javillo, el guayabón, el pilón, el indio desnudo y el lechoso. La mayor parte de los árboles están cubiertos por una capa de musgos y líquenes y en las ramas proliferas las orquídeas y otros tipos de plantas epífitas. En el sotobosque, abundan los helechos arborescentes y sobre el piso es común la selaginela Selaginella sp.

La fauna es rica y variada, aunque la mayoría de las especies, por vivir en las copas o ser nocturnas son poco visibles.

La Reserva Biológica Hitoy Cerere, ubicada a 3 kilómetros alberga unas 40 especies de mamíferos, incluyendo algunas en peligro de extinción. Entre ellas están el manigordo, la ceibita, la danta, el jaguar y el saíno. Los más fácilmente observados son el tepezcuintles, las guatuzas, los conejos, mapaches, pizotes, ardillas, el perezoso de tres dedos, la ceibita o serafín de platanar, el zorro cuatro ojos, la nutria, el zorro de balsa, el cabro de monte, el tolomuco, el tigrillo, y los monos congo y carablanca. Se han observado más de 230 especies de aves en el área, incluyendo la oropéndola de Montezuma, que se congrega para construir gran cantidad de nidos colgantes en un solo árbol; el zopilote, el loro cabeciazul, el bobo chizo, el oropopo, el colibrí pechiazul, el trogón coliplomizo, el martín pescador verde y el curré negro. Algunas como la lechuza de orejas, el gavilán negro y el ave canasta tienen poblaciones reducidas. Otras como el mosquero coludo, las oropéndolas y los martines pescadores, el sargento, los tucanes y las pavas, son comúnmente vistos durante las caminatas por los senderos y en el río. También es frecuente ver ranas habitantes de la hojarasca, chirbalas, gallegos, cherepos y serpientes, tanto venenosas como inofensivas. Se conocen unas 30 especies de anfibios y otras 30 de reptiles. Dentro de los invertebrados hay hormigas bala y zompopas, mariposas de vistosos colores como las del género Morpho, libélulas enormes, abejas y abejones de colores metálicos. En cuanto a las especies vegetales, se conocen unas 380. Los bosques son siempre verdes y muy densos.

Estado Actual

Aunque todavía existen algunos bloques grandes de hábitat intacto, los vastos bosques de tierras bajas del Caribe se han visto seriamente fragmentados en los últimos años (Sánchez-Azofeifa et al. 1999). Los bosques perennes tropicales están entre los menos representados en el sistema de áreas protegidas de Costa Rica (Stiles, 1985), aunque existen grandes reservas en el sur de Nicaragua y el este de Panamá. La mayoría de los parques forestales húmedos de las tierras bajas son demasiado pequeños y aislados para mantener poblaciones viables de especies de gran alcance; el único conectado con bosques altos es La Selva en Costa Rica (poco más de 1.700 ha), que es demasiado pequeño para proteger gran parte de la avifauna (Boza 1996 y pers. comm, Stiles y Skutch 1989) y otros taxones más grandes. Sólo cerca de 130.000 ha en la zona Atlántica de las tierras bajas están actualmente protegidas y las difíciles condiciones económicas ofrecen pocas probabilidades de que el área en protección se amplíe significativamente (Powell et al 1992).

La falta de protección de las tierras bajas del Caribe y el fuerte sesgo hacia la deforestación en las elevaciones por debajo de los 1.000 m sobre el nivel del mar (Powell et al 1992) contribuyen a la fragmentación y eliminación de estos bosques. Con pendientes graduales y un acceso relativamente bueno, gran parte del bosque de ladera restante de Costa Rica ha sido intervenido o existe en pequeños fragmentos.

Tipos y Gravedad de las Amenazas

Las áreas planas con suelos aluviales se encuentran en cultivo de banano, mientras que los suelos de basalto menos fértiles han sido talados más recientemente y convertidos en pasturas ganaderas. Los últimos bosques intactos que quedan en esta ecoregión están actualmente bajo una tremenda presión maderera y están siendo talados rápidamente (proambiente 1998). En algunos casos se está dando destrucción no reglamentada, a pesar de la legislación vigente para proteger los bosques. Los claros incluso se han hecho ilegalmente dentro de muchos parques-incluyendo el Parque Nacional Tortuguero-que ahora proporciona acceso a los cazadores furtivos.

El corredor biológico mesoamericano, que tiene como objetivo mejorar la conectividad entre los hábitats de la vertiente atlántica, puede proporcionar algunos apoyos necesarios para áreas protegidas nuevas o expandidas o para pagos por servicios ambientales proporcionados por tierras privadas.

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Estadísticas2018-06-19T07:42:56-06:00

Bosques y Biodiversidad a Nivel Mundial

Los bosques albergan cerca del 80% de la biodiversidad terrestre del planeta. De éstos, los ecosistemas tropicales cubren cerca del 7% de la superficie terrestre, pero mantienen al menos la mitad de las especies de plantas y animales terrestres, muchas de las cuales todavía no han sido descubiertas por la ciencia.

Los bosques desempeñan una función esencial en el ciclo del agua, la conservación de los suelos, la fijación de carbono y la protección de los hábitats.

De las 8.300 especies conocidas de animales, el 8 por ciento ya está extinto y otro 22 por ciento corre el riesgo de desaparecer.

REFERENCIAS

Deforestación y Pérdida de Biodiversidad

Los bosques son esenciales para nuestro futuro. Más de 1600 millones de personas dependen de ellos para la alimentación, el agua, el combustible, los medicamentos, las culturas tradicionales y los medios de subsistencia. Los bosques juegan un papel vital en la salvaguarda del clima mediante el secuestro natural de carbono. Sin embargo, cada año desaparece un promedio de 13 millones de hectáreas de bosque, lo que, a nivel mundial, representa el 17.4% del equivalente a las emisiones de efecto invernadero.

En los países tropicales y subtropicales, la agricultura comercial a gran escala y la agricultura de subsistencia originaron el 73 % de la deforestación, con variaciones significativas según la región. Por ejemplo, la agricultura comercial originó casi el 70 % de la deforestación en América Latina, pero solo un tercio en África, donde la agricultura a pequeña escala constituye un factor más significativo.

REFERENCIAS

Causas Pérdida de Biodiversidad

En el último reporte global del Convenio de Diversidad Biológica (Secretaría CDB, 2014) se concluye que una de las mayores causas de la pérdida de biodiversidad está dada por las presiones vinculadas a la agricultura, que abarcan 70% de la pérdida estimada de la biodiversidad terrestre. La conversión de los bosques para la producción de productos básicos, como la soja, el aceite de palma, carne y el papel, el desarrollo de infraestructura, expansión urbana, energía, minería, explotación petrolífera, grandes embalses y explotación forestal también amenazan con la deforestación, siendo la explotación forestal a gran escala una de las más significativas a nivel mundial.

La Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza (UICN) considera amenazadas al 36% de las 48.000 especies evaluadas hasta el 2010 y el Living Planet Index (WWF-UNEP), que sintetiza la evolución de 5000 poblaciones de 1700 especies de vertebrados en todo el mundo, registra un declive medio del 40% en los últimos 30 años (2013).

REFERENCIAS

Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible – Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS) (PNUD)

La agenda 2030 sobre los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS), también conocidos como Objetivos Mundiales, son un llamado universal a la adopción de medidas para poner fin a la pobreza, proteger el planeta y garantizar que todas las personas gocen de paz y prosperidad. Los 17 Objetivos se basan en los logros de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio, aunque incluyen nuevas esferas como el cambio climático, la desigualdad económica, la innovación, el consumo sostenible y la paz y la justicia, entre otras prioridades. Los Objetivos están interrelacionados, con frecuencia la clave del éxito de uno involucrará las cuestiones más frecuentemente vinculadas con otro.

Erradicar la pobreza en todas sus formas sigue siendo uno de los principales desafíos que enfrenta la humanidad. Si bien la cantidad de personas que viven en la extrema pobreza disminuyó en más de la mitad entre 1990 y 2015 (de 1.900 millones a 836 millones), aún demasiadas luchan por satisfacer las necesidades más básicas. A nivel mundial, más de 800 millones de personas aún viven con menos de US$1,25 al día y muchos carecen de acceso a alimentos, agua potable y saneamiento adecuados. El crecimiento económico acelerado de países como China e India ha sacado a millones de personas de la pobreza, pero el progreso ha sido disparejo. La posibilidad de que las mujeres vivan en situación de pobreza es desproporcionadamente alta en relación con los hombres, debido al acceso desigual al trabajo remunerado, la educación y la propiedad

Terminar con todas las formas de hambre y desnutrición para 2030 y velar por el acceso de todas las personas. El hambre extrema y la desnutrición siguen siendo grandes obstáculos para el desarrollo de muchos países. Se estima que 795 millones de personas sufrían de desnutrición crónica en 2014, a menudo como consecuencia directa de la degradación ambiental, la sequía y la pérdida de biodiversidad. Más de 90 millones de niños menores de cinco años tienen un peso peligrosamente bajo y una de cada cuatro personas pasa hambre en África.

El objetivo es lograr una cobertura universal de salud y facilitar medicamentos y vacunas seguras y asequibles para todos. Una parte esencial de este proceso es apoyar la investigación y el desarrollo de vacunas. A pesar de estos avances tan notables, todos los años mueren más de 6 millones de niños antes de cumplir cinco años y 16.000 menores fallecen a diario debido a enfermedades prevenibles, como el sarampión y la tuberculosis. Todos los días, cientos de mujeres mueren durante el embarazo o el parto y en zonas rurales solo el 56 por ciento de los nacimientos es asistido por profesionales capacitados. El SIDA es ahora la principal causa de muerte entre los adolescentes de África subsahariana, una región que continúa sufriendo los estragos de esta enfermedad.

El objetivo de lograr una educación inclusiva y de calidad para todos se basa en la firme convicción de que la educación es uno de los motores más poderosos y probados para garantizar el desarrollo sostenible. Con este fin, el objetivo busca asegurar que todas las niñas y niños completen su educación primaria y secundaria gratuita para 2030. También aspira a proporcionar acceso igualitario a formación técnica asequible y eliminar las disparidades de género e ingresos, además de lograr el acceso universal a educación superior de calidad. Desde el 2000 se ha registrado un enorme progreso en la meta relativa a la educación primaria universal. La tasa total de matrícula alcanzó el 91% en las regiones en desarrollo en 2015 y la cantidad de niños que no asisten a la escuela disminuyó casi a la mitad a nivel mundial. También ha habido aumentos significativos en las tasas de alfabetización y más niñas que nunca antes asisten hoy a la escuela.

Garantizar el acceso universal a salud reproductiva y sexual y otorgar a la mujer derechos igualitarios en el acceso a recursos económicos, como tierras y propiedades, son metas fundamentales para conseguir este objetivo. Hoy más mujeres que nunca ocupan cargos públicos, pero alentar a más mujeres para que se conviertan en líderes en todas las regiones ayudará a fortalecer las políticas y las leyes orientadas a lograr una mayor igualdad entre los géneros.

Con el fin de garantizar el acceso universal al agua potable segura y asequible para todos en 2030, es necesario realizar inversiones adecuadas en infraestructura, proporcionar instalaciones sanitarias y fomentar prácticas de higiene en todos los niveles. La escasez de agua afecta a más del 40 por ciento de la población mundial, una cifra alarmante que probablemente crecerá con el aumento de las temperaturas globales producto del cambio climático. Aunque 2.100 millones de personas han conseguido acceso a mejores condiciones de agua y saneamiento desde 1990, la decreciente disponibilidad de agua potable de calidad es un problema importante que aqueja a todos los continentes.

Expandir la infraestructura y mejorar la tecnología para contar con energía limpia en todos los países en desarrollo, es un objetivo crucial que puede estimular el crecimiento y a la vez ayudar al medio ambiente. Entre 1990 y 2010, la cantidad de personas con acceso a energía eléctrica aumentó en 1.700 millones. Sin embargo, a la par con el crecimiento de la población mundial, también lo hará la demanda de energía accesible. La economía global dependiente de los combustibles fósiles y el aumento de las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero están generando cambios drásticos en nuestro sistema climático, y estas consecuencias han tenido un impacto en cada continente.

Los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible apuntan a estimular el crecimiento económico sostenible mediante el aumento de los niveles de productividad y la innovación tecnológica. Fomentar políticas que estimulen el espíritu empresarial y la creación de empleo es crucial para este fin, así como también las medidas eficaces para erradicar el trabajo forzoso, la esclavitud y el tráfico humano. Con estas metas en consideración, el objetivo es lograr empleo pleno y productivo y un trabajo decente para todos los hombres y mujeres para 2030. Durante los últimos 25 años, la cantidad de trabajadores que viven en condiciones de pobreza extrema ha disminuido drásticamente, pese al impacto de la crisis económica de 2008 y las recesiones globales. En los países en desarrollo, la clase media representa hoy más del 34% del empleo total, una cifra que casi se triplicó entre 1991 y 2015.

Reducir esta brecha digital es crucial para garantizar el acceso igualitario a la información y el conocimiento, y promover la innovación y el emprendimiento. La inversión en infraestructura y la innovación son motores fundamentales del crecimiento y el desarrollo económico. Con más de la mitad de la población mundial viviendo en ciudades, el transporte masivo y la energía renovable son cada vez más importantes, así como también el crecimiento de nuevas industrias y de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones. Más de 4.000 millones de personas aún no tienen acceso a Internet y el 90 por ciento proviene del mundo en desarrollo.

La desigualad de ingresos es un problema mundial que requiere soluciones globales. Estas incluyen mejorar la regulación y el control de los mercados y las instituciones financieras y fomentar la asistencia para el desarrollo y la inversión extranjera directa para las regiones que más lo necesiten. Otro factor clave para salvar esta distancia es facilitar la migración y la movilidad segura de las personas. La desigualdad está en aumento y que el 10 por ciento más rico de la población se queda hasta con el 40 por ciento del ingreso mundial total. A su vez, el 10 por ciento más pobre obtiene solo entre el 2 y el 7 por ciento del ingreso total. En los países en desarrollo, la desigualdad ha aumentado un 11 por ciento, si se considera el aumento de la población.

Mejorar la seguridad y la sostenibilidad de las ciudades implica garantizar el acceso a viviendas seguras y asequibles y el mejoramiento de los asentamientos marginales. También incluye realizar inversiones en transporte público, crear áreas públicas verdes y mejorar la planificación y gestión urbana de manera que sea participativa e inclusiva. Más de la mitad de la población mundial vive hoy en zonas urbanas. En 2050, esa cifra habrá aumentado a 6.500 millones de personas, dos tercios de la humanidad. No es posible lograr un desarrollo sostenible sin transformar radicalmente la forma en que construimos y administramos los espacios urbanos. El rápido crecimiento de las urbes en el mundo en desarrollo, en conjunto con el aumento de la migración del campo a la cuidad, ha provocado un incremento explosivo de las mega urbes. En 1990, había 10 ciudades con más de 10 millones de habitantes en el mundo. En 2014, la cifra había aumentado a 28 millones, donde viven en total cerca de 453 millones de personas.

El consumo de una gran proporción de la población mundial sigue siendo insuficiente para satisfacer incluso sus necesidades básicas. En este contexto, es importante reducir a la mitad el desperdicio per cápita de alimentos en el mundo a nivel de comercio minorista y consumidores para crear cadenas de producción y suministro más eficientes. Esto puede aportar a la seguridad alimentaria y llevarnos hacia una economía que utilice los recursos de manera más eficiente. Para lograr crecimiento económico y desarrollo sostenible, es urgente reducir la huella ecológica mediante un cambio en los métodos de producción y consumo de bienes y recursos. La agricultura es el principal consumidor de agua en el mundo y el riego representa hoy casi el 70 por ciento de toda el agua dulce disponible para el consumo humano.

Apoyar a las regiones más vulnerables -como los países sin litoral y los Estados islas- a adaptarse al cambio climático, debe ir de la mano con los esfuerzos destinados a integrar las medidas de reducción del riesgo de desastres en las políticas y estrategias nacionales. Con voluntad política y un amplio abanico de medidas tecnológicas, aún es posible limitar el aumento de la temperatura media global a 2°C respecto de los niveles preindustriales. Para lograrlo, se requieren acciones colectivas urgentes. Las pérdidas anuales promedio causadas solo por terremotos, tsunamis, ciclones tropicales e inundaciones alcanzan los cientos de miles de millones de dólares y exigen inversiones de unos US$ 6.000 millones anuales solo en gestión del riesgo de desastres. El objetivo a nivel de acción climática es movilizar US$ 100.000 millones anualmente hasta 2020, con el fin de abordar las necesidades de los países en desarrollo y ayudar a mitigar los desastres relacionados con el clima.

Los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible generan un marco para ordenar y proteger de manera sostenible los ecosistemas marinos y costeros de la contaminación terrestre, así como para abordar los impactos de la acidificación de los océanos. Mejorar la conservación y el uso sostenible de los recursos oceánicos a través del derecho internacional también ayudará a mitigar algunos de los retos que enfrentan los océanos. Los medios de vida de más de 3.000 millones de personas dependen de la biodiversidad marina y costera. Sin embargo, el 30 por ciento de las poblaciones de peces del mundo está sobreexplotado, alcanzando un nivel muy por debajo del necesario para producir un rendimiento sostenible. Los océanos también absorben alrededor del 30 por ciento del dióxido de carbón generado por las actividades humanas y se ha registrado un 26 por ciento de aumento en la acidificación de los mares desde el inicio de la revolución industrial. La contaminación marina, que proviene en su mayor parte de fuentes terrestres, ha llegado a niveles alarmantes: por cada kilómetro cuadrado de océano hay un promedio de 13.000 trozos de desechos plásticos.

Proteger, restablecer y promover el uso sostenible de los ecosistemas terrestres, gestionar sosteniblemente los bosques, luchar contra la desertificación, detener e invertir la degradación de las tierras y detener la pérdida de biodiversidad”. La actual degradación del suelo no tiene precedentes y la pérdida de tierras cultivables es de 30 a 35 veces superior al ritmo histórico. Las sequías y la desertificación también aumentan todos los años; sus pérdidas equivalen a 12 millones de hectáreas y afectan a las comunidades pobres de todo el mundo. De las 8.300 especies conocidas de animales, el 8 por ciento ya está extinto y otro 22 por ciento corre el riesgo de desaparecer.

Los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible buscan reducir sustancialmente todas las formas de violencia y trabajan con los gobiernos y las comunidades para encontrar soluciones duraderas a los conflictos e inseguridad. El fortalecimiento del Estado de derecho y la promoción de los derechos humanos es fundamental en este proceso, así como la reducción del flujo de armas ilícitas y la consolidación de la participación de los países en desarrollo en las instituciones de gobernabilidad mundial.

Los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible solo se pueden lograr con el compromiso decidido a favor de alianzas mundiales y cooperación. Si bien la asistencia oficial para el desarrollo de las economías desarrolladas aumentó en 66 por ciento entre 2000 y 2014, las crisis humanitarias provocadas por conflictos o desastres naturales continúan demandando más recursos y ayuda financiera. Muchos países también requieren de esta asistencia para estimular el crecimiento y el intercambio comercial. Hoy el mundo está más interconectado que nunca. Mejorar el acceso a la tecnología y los conocimientos es una forma importante de intercambiar ideas y propiciar la innovación. Para lograr el crecimiento y desarrollo sostenibles, es vital que se coordinen las políticas para ayudar a los países en desarrollo a manejar su deuda y para promover inversiones para los menos desarrollados. La finalidad de los objetivos es mejorar la cooperación Norte-Sur y Sur-Sur, apoyando los planes nacionales en el cumplimiento de todas las metas. Promover el comercio internacional y ayudar a los países en desarrollo para que aumenten sus exportaciones, forma parte del desafío de lograr un sistema de comercio universal equitativo y basado en reglas que sea justo, abierto y beneficie a todos.

REFERENCIA:

Costa Rica

Costa Rica es importante a nivel internacional en términos de su biodiversidad porque en un territorio relativamente pequeño alberga una gran riqueza de especies aproximadamente el 3,6% de la biodiversidad esperada para el planeta (entre 13 y 14 millones de especies). El país cuenta con un registro aproximado de 95,157 de especies conocidas al 2015, es decir, aproximadamente el 5% de la biodiversidad que se conoce en todo el mundo (cerca de dos millones de especies conocidas al año 2005) (Estrategia Nacional de Biodiversidad 2016 – 2025).

No obstante, hay múltiples señales y reportes de que esta biodiversidad se está perdiendo y deteriorando; por ejemplo, la “Lista Roja” de la Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza (UICN) registró un crecimiento del 12.9% en el número de especies amenazadas entre 2011 y 2014 (SINAC, 2014 y PEN, 2015).

En los paisajes más rurales, la transformación de hábitats más prominente ocurrió a mediados de siglo pasado, especialmente en el paisaje ganadero. En las últimas décadas, el país ha recuperado su cobertura boscosa hasta llegar a un 53% a nivel nacional en el 2014; un hito de Costa Rica a nivel mundial; sin embargo, en algunos casos se ha transformado en prácticas agrícolas más intensivas en cuanto a uso de agroquímicos y se ha perdido cobertura neta de algunos humedales, en particular manglares, por la transformación agrícola.

Gestión territorial: La forma en que se ocupa y gestiona el suelo es clave para entender el desempeño ambiental. Los patrones que se observan hoy en el país comprometen la sostenibilidad: en la última medición internacional de la huella ecológica (Global Footprint Network, 2017, con datos de 2013) Costa Rica muestra una brecha de 62,1% entre el uso que su población hace de los recursos, y la capacidad del territorio para proveerlos y reponerlos, esa brecha se hace evidente en dos aspectos: El crecimiento urbano y el uso del suelo agropecuario.

Recursos Hídricos: La Dirección de Aguas del Minae estima que en el país la disponibilidad de agua dulce es de 103.120 millones de metros cúbicos anuales, de los cuales en 2016 se extrajeron para todos los usos, 12.436 millones, el 98,6% fueron de fuentes superficiales y un 1,4% del subsuelo.

REFERENCIAS

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Patrocine2018-04-26T10:02:52-06:00

Uniquely Built For You

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Personal

$399/mo
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod.
  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua.
  • Ut enim ad minim venia.
  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex.
  • Ea commodo consequat.

Business

$699/mo
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod.
  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua.
  • Ut enim ad minim venia.
  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex.
  • Ea commodo consequat.

Enterprise

$999/mo
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod.
  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua.
  • Ut enim ad minim venia.
  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex.
  • Ea commodo consequat.

Financial Growth

Real Growth For Business, Personal or Enterprise

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Contact Us

Client Feedback

“Avada Finance offers a fantastic service! It is so easy to use and the customer support is the best around. This payment option is my number one choice. I always recommend it.”

ANDRE MENDOZA

CREATIVE MARKET

“Avada Finance offers a fantastic service! It is so easy to use and the customer support is the best around. This payment option is my number one choice. I always recommend it.”

ANDRE MENDOZA

CREATIVE MARKET

“Avada Finance offers a fantastic service! It is so easy to use and the customer support is the best around. This payment option is my number one choice. I always recommend it.”

ANDRE MENDOZA

CREATIVE MARKET

“Avada Finance offers a fantastic service! It is so easy to use and the customer support is the best around. This payment option is my number one choice. I always recommend it.”

ANDRE MENDOZA

CREATIVE MARKET

Ready to talk?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit mod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Let’s Talk
Panamá2018-06-19T07:40:26-06:00

Punto de encuentro de culturas provenientes de todo el mundo

Panamá​ es un país ubicado en el sureste de América Central. Su nombre oficial es República de Panamá y su capital es la ciudad de Panamá. ​ Limita al norte con el mar Caribe, al sur con el océano Pacífico, al este con Colombia y al oeste con Costa Rica. Tiene una extensión de 75 420 km².​ Localizado en el istmo de Panamá, istmo que une a América del Sur con América Central, su territorio montañoso solamente es interrumpido por el canal de Panamá. Su población es de 4.115.897.2​ El 1º de enero de 2014 se crea la provincia de Panamá Oeste, así estando constituida por 10 provincias y por cinco comarcas indígenas.

Su condición de país de tránsito lo convirtió tempranamente en un punto de encuentro de culturas provenientes de todo el mundo. El país es el escenario geográfico del canal de Panamá, obra que facilita la comunicación entre las costas de los océanos Atlántico y Pacífico y que influye significativamente en el comercio mundial. Y ahora con la reciente inauguración del Canal ampliado, ofrece un mayor tránsito de culturas. Por su posición geográfica actualmente ofrece al mundo una amplia plataforma de servicios marítimos, comerciales, inmobiliarios y financieros, entre ellos la Zona Libre de Colón, la zona franca más grande del continente y la segunda del mundo.

Unidades de Conservación en Panamá

Ver más

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Costa Rica2018-06-22T13:24:22-06:00

Costa Rica 2021
Primer país carbono neutral del mundo

Costa Rica, denominada oficialmente República de Costa Rica, es una nación soberana, organizada como una república presidencialista unitaria, está ubicada en América Central, posee un territorio con un área total de 51 100 km². Limita con Nicaragua al norte, el mar Caribe al este, Panamá al sureste y el océano Pacífico al oeste. En cuanto a los límites marítimos, colinda con Panamá, Nicaragua, Colombia y Ecuador (a través de la Isla del Coco). Es una de las democracias más sólidas del planeta. Ganó reconocimiento mundial por abolir el ejército el 1 de diciembre de 1948, abolición que fue perpetuada en la Constitución Política de 1949.

En 2007, el gobierno costarricense anunció planes para convertirse en el primer país carbono neutral del mundo para el año 2021, cuando cumplirá su bicentenario como nación independiente. Además, está considerado como el estado más feliz, ecológico, verde y sostenible de todo el planeta, según el Happy Planet Index de 2016, publicado por el think tank británico New Economics Foundation, que cataloga de esta manera al país consecutivamente desde hace 7 años.

Unidades de Conservación en Costa Rica

Ver más
Ver más
Ver más

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Contacto2018-10-18T13:51:39-06:00

Juntos podemos hacer grandes cosas.

La conservación es el factor más importante en la Economía Mundial.

Blog2018-06-19T09:30:30-06:00

What is biodiversity and why does it matter to us?

June 19th, 2018|0 Comments

It is the variety of life on Earth, in all its forms and all its interactions. If that sounds bewilderingly broad, that’s because it is. Biodiversity is the most complex feature of our planet and it is the most vital. “Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity,” says Prof David Macdonald, at Oxford University.

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Áreas de Conservación2018-06-15T12:40:15-06:00

Small Business Loans

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur

  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt

  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam

  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

  • Aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Credit Rating Advice

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur

  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt

  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam

  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

  • Aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Crowd Funding

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur

  • Adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt

  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam

  • UllaLaboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

  • Aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

87%

Successful
Applications

94%

Return On
Investment

100%

Completely
Secure

Ready to talk?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit mod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Let’s Talk
¿Quiénes somos?2019-05-18T15:35:06-06:00

Nature Economy & Conservation

Nature Economy & Conservation nace en el 2017 con el propósito determinante de darle a la humanidad una nueva ecuación económica, en la cual el ser humano, la prosperidad y la naturaleza del planeta sean predominantes.

NE&C está enfocada en una primera etapa a la conservación de los bosques primarios en zonas del mundo en las que de manera certificable pueden retribuir más en términos de oxígeno, hídricos, biodiversidad y proyección hacia poblaciones cercanas.

Propósito

Ser un ente global generador de un nuevo paradigma; del diseño e implementación de un estándar de economía mundial en términos de conservación y recuperación de la naturaleza, principalmente primaria o virgen, así como de la mitigación y el desarrollo de comunidades.

Promesa

Ser una empresa referente a nivel global de economía para la conservación y recuperación de la naturaleza, para el equilibrio de la humanidad, apoyados en la tecnología de cadena de bloques (Blockchain) para generar transparencia en nuestra gestión y garantizar el cumplimento de los objetivos.

Valores

   Transparencia
   Excelencia
   Calidad
   Solidaridad
   Felicidad
   Comunicación
   Perseverancia
   Creatividad e Innovación

Equipo NE&C

Mauricio TrejosHead of Global Strategy
Mauricio se unió a NE&C en el 2017 siguiendo una carrera en Estrategia de Proyectos liderando un rápido crecimiento y transformación en negocios de distintos sectores …
Ver Perfil
Alex MarínOrganizational planning
Ingeniero industrial apasionado en la conservación ambiental, unido al equipo de NE&C desde el 2017; cuenta con más de 10 años de experiencia en desarrollo e implementación…
Ver Perfil

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together
Inicio2018-06-19T07:36:08-06:00

Certificados para la Conservación del Ambiente y la Biodiversidad

Actualmente, NE&C está desarrollando un certificado que incluye aspectos socioeconómicos y científicos en miles de hectáreas en Panamá (Tapón de Darién) y en Costa Rica, utilizando diversas herramientas tecnológicas como Blockchain (cadena de bloques) para garantizar la absoluta transparencia y efectividad de todos los procesos.

.

¿Qué es la tecnología Blockchain?

Blockchain es un sistema distribuido que actúa como un “libro abierto” para almacenar y manejar las transacciones o la información. Los registros, tal como se definen en International Records Management (ISO 15489-1: 2016) son “información creada, recibida y mantenida como evidencia y como un activo para una organización o persona, en cumplimiento de obligaciones legales o en la transacción de negocios”. Cada registro en la base de datos se llama bloque y contiene detalles tales como la marca de tiempo de la transacción y el enlace al bloque o registro anterior.

Esos registros son inmutables, por lo que es imposible alterar o modificar la información en forma retroactiva. Además, debido a que la misma transacción se registra en múltiples sistemas de bases de datos distribuidas, la tecnología es altamente segura por diseño.

La peculiaridad más importante de la tecnología Blockchain es su inmutabilidad, esto significa que la información permanece en el mismo estado ad perpetuam.

¿Cómo funciona un certificado digital de conservación NE&C utilizando la cadena de bloques?

Proceso de Certificación
Nature Economy & Conservation

ACUERDO DE COOPERACIÓN

NE&C, las comunidades y los propietarios de tierras interesados ​​en la conservación se reúnen para trabajar por el medio ambiente.

FIRMA Y NOTARIZACIÓN DE CONTRATOS

NE&C siguiendo todas las leyes locales notariza y valida toda la documentación.

CERTIFICADO
NE&C

NE&C verifica y recopila toda la documentación pertinente, detalla los inventarios biológicos y los digitaliza.

PROTECCIÓN EN LA CADENA DE BLOQUES

Los documentos del certificado de conservación NE&C son compilados en un archivo comprimido y se guardan en la seguridad de la cadena de bloques NEM.

CERTIFICADO DIGITAL APOSTILLADO

Los conservadores o mitigadores obtienen el Certificado Digital NE&C, que por la tecnología utilizada está abierta a la validación y/o verificación de cualquier persona u organización.

Áreas de Conservación

Las áreas protegidas NE&C son espacios creados que articulan esfuerzos que garanticen la vida animal y vegetal en condiciones de bienestar, es decir, la conservación de la biodiversidad, así como el mantenimiento de los procesos ecológicos necesarios para su preservación y el desarrollo del ser humano.

El Mundo en Números

Leer más
0%
De los bosques albergan la biodiversidad terrestre del planeta
0%
De las especies ya está extinto
0%
De las especies corre el riesgo de desaparecer
0%
De la biodiversidad se ha perdido a causa de la agricultura

The species of the world wait for you.

 

Let’s do it together